Courses

Blackwood Golf Club

Cherry Gardens Road
Cherry Gardens, SA, 5157
Australia

Region: 4. Adelaide

Blackwood Golf Club

Blackwood Golf Club is an 18 hole private members club. This picturesque, gently sloping, hills course is the ideal location for relaxed private and corporate golf. It is also the perfect location for your wedding reception, corporate lunch or Christmas dinner.

Blackwood Golf Club is an 18 hole private members club located in the Adelaide Hills only 40 minutes from the centre of Adelaide.

This picturesque, gently sloping, hills course is the ideal location for relaxed private and corporate golf. It is also the perfect location for your wedding reception, corporate lunch or Christmas dinner.

Course Information

Par: 72
ACR: 72
Length (m): 6073
Architect: Mr V Morcom
Design Year: 1961

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Glenelg Golf Club

James Melrose Road
Novar Gardens, SA, 5040
Australia

Region: 4. Adelaide

Glenelg Golf Club

The Glenelg Golf Club is one of South Australia's top golf clubs with a world class course and modern clubhouse facilities. It has recently undergone an extensive redevelopment project to improve the quality and playability of the golf course.

The Glenelg Golf Club is one of South Australia's top golf clubs with a world class course and modern clubhouse facilities.  It is located adjacent to the Adelaide Airport and only a short distance from the Adelaide CBD.

Glenelg Golf Club has recently undergone an extensive redevelopment project to improve the quality and playability of the golf course, under the expert guidance of Golf Course Architect, Neil Crafter and with the assistance of Bob Tuohy.

Glenelg has been the site of many State and National championships throughout its history, including the Australian Amateur Championships (Men and Women), Men's Interstate Series, Australian Junior Championships (Boys and Girls) and South Australian Open's and PGA's.

Course Information

Par: 71
ACR: 71
Length (m): 6267
Architect: Vern Morcom (1947), Neil Crafter and Bob Tuohy (1998 and ongoing)
Design Year: 1947
Top 100: 39

Playing Tips

1
Par 4, Length 293m

The green is visible from the tee, as are the range of options the golfer has to choose from depending on mood and confidence.An iron from the tee to the more generous landing area leaves a short to mid iron to a slightly elevated green protected by two pot bunkers on the right. The more courageous will have to thread their driver between mounds and grasses on the left, and water on the right to leave themselves a short pitch to the green.Either way, this hole is best played from the left half of the fairway, and provides a wonderful introduction to the features you will experience during your round at Glenelg.

2
Par 4, Length 418m

At the outside of the dog-leg, a pot bunker is in range for the longer hitter who fails to shape the drive from right to left, but out of reach for the average golfer.A small bunker sited short left of the green and the right greenside bunker define the approach to this subtle green. The bunkering style used, with its sod revetted faces, is a feature of the course, which harks back to the traditional British links.

3
Par 3, Length 200m

The siting brings the interesting linear complex of pine covered sand ridges located between the 2nd and 3rd holes as a hazard along the right side of the long par 3. The green is large and undulating, but has been kept open at the left half to allow a running approach access to the green. This long par 3 is part of the demanding starting holes at Glenelg and one which will prove a challenging hole to all golfers. A rear tee, adding some 20 metres to the length of this hole increases the challenge during tournament play.

4
Par 4, Length 314m

A small bunker has been placed in the fairway, some 20-25 metres short of the fairway bunker on the left side. This calls for precision in the layup shot, but as the fairway to the left widens out there are plenty of options short of, over or around this bunker, which is a traditional British links element.The green complex is bunkered on both sides with a deep pot bunker front right. The front right pot bunker allows for a tight championship pin.

5
Par 5, Length 497m

This is achieved by providing distinct landing zones for each calibre of golfer with hazard positioning to impact more on the better player. A wetland is sited right of the fairway around an island of original native vegetation. Bunkering on the left catches a shot that leaks off the line of play, and a group of cross bunkers just short of the green requires careful placement for the layup. The green is receptive to a well played approach, but its undulations place a premium on positioning and putting. The green is guarded by two pot bunkers set into the ridge at the left and by a large bunker front right.

6
Par 4, Length 431m

When downwind, the corner can be taken on at your own peril as a cluster of small bunkers awaits through the dogleg, as well as a notorious hidden pot on the left of the fairway. Reaching the green from these bunkers is usually out of the question, with the greedy often paying a heavy price for trying to advance the ball too far. If fairway is found, a very accurate mid to long iron is required to the slightly elevated, long narrow green heavily bunkered on both sides. The green is quite subtle, but can become very fast downhill on the front half of the green which is quite exposed to the wind.

7
Par 4, Length 392m

The prevailing south westerly will see drives having to negotiate fairway bunkering left and right to allow a mid to short iron downwind to the green. Into a northerly, a well struck drive to the left half of the fairway will be required to get a full view of the green and the long iron shot ahead. The green setting is spectacular, with enormous drama to the sides and rear in the form of mounds and grasses that form an amphitheatre around the green. Two small pot bunkers guard the approach to the green, but once on the surface, putting should not be overly complicated on a relatively flat surface. Due reward for having got there in the first place.

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Par 4, Length 407m

An imposing tee shot confronts all golfers. Water and sand hills have to be negotiated by the drive, with the safer left line leaving two more shots to the green for the shorter hitter. The longer drive has to avoid a bunker left of the fairway, as well as the wetland waiting for a drive not shaped from left to right.The elevated green setting has been magnificently utilized with a sprawling bunker left ready to swallow an errant approach shot, and hollows and mounds to the right making chipping a challenge. The green itself is large and very receptive to shots from the right half of the fairway with a good old fashioned bump and run certain to come into play from just short of the green.

9
Par 4, Length 366m

A small pot bunker sited 230 metres from the back tee needs to be negotiated by the longer hitters seeking the preferred line of approach into the green. The green is long and narrow with a significant ridge extending into the green from the right greenside bunker. This bunker impacts on the line of approach into the green encouraging the preferred approach from the left half of the fairway. Left of the green, a distinct grassy hollow captures shots that roll down from the left bank and to provide a particular degree of difficulty for recovery shots.

10
Par 4, Length 382m

Great importance is placed on the length and accuracy of the tee shot, as the crest of the hill needs to be reached to gain a view of the green set below. A cavernous bunker on the right side of the fairway awaits the longer hitter who fails to work the ball to the left. The green has three levels placing an emphasis on precision with the iron shot to the green. Once on the correct level, the golfer is rewarded with relatively flat putts. The green is well bunkered left, right, and long, with successful recovery requiring a delicate bunker shot. The bunkers provide a stunning frame for the green, as do the native grasses and pines, creating an amphitheatre style setting.

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Par 3, Length 166m

The large bunker right of the green has two distinct sections, with the more heavily used first section somewhat shallower than the back section, making recovery for most golfers a little less daunting. The putting surface has a strong fall from back to front, but the front left corner of the green is slightly raised to retain more tee shots and recovery shots from the right hand bunker.Miss the green the left, and a par is difficult to achieve as two deep hollows require a delicate chip to get close to the hole.

12
Par 5, Length 459m

The drive is best placed in the right half of the fairway to gain a view of the green, but must avoid two sighter bunkers through the fairway that eliminate any thought of reaching the greens in two. The green is situated in a dell and has a distinct slope away from the approach shot. A ridge runs along the left side of the green, with a small grassy knob sticking into the right side of the green. A spectacular setting for a green that will test even the best putters.

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Par 4, Length 365m

A new green was constructed in a totally new location and is set at the base of the course?s major sand dune, Pine Hill, which is being re-vegetated and will provide a stunning backdrop once matured. Once at the dogleg, the golfer is faced with a mid to short iron, usually back into the prevailing breeze, to a green protected by water on the left and small bunkers to the right and rear of the green. The putting surface is not overly large, but two putts from above the hole can prove tricky when the greens are quick.

14
Par 3, Length 162m

Often played down breeze, the tee shot needs to be well struck to hold the gently undulating green, as the steep drop over the back makes recovery very difficult. A running approach shaped from left to right is possible but made difficult by an approach bunker some 20 metres short of the green, which also makes club selection from the tee deceiving. This hole is beautifully framed by native vegetation and water, and is indicative of the character of the course throughout.

15
Par 4, Length 369m

Hitting north, the drive on the 15th must negotiate a number of carefully placed bunkers, protecting not only the long drive, but also making players think very carefully about where they lay up with iron. There is no easy tee shot here. Two deep traps protecting the left side of the fairway can be trouble. Similarly, if you try to take on the slight dogleg and bunker carry, you could find yourself needing your bathers as sand and water could come into play. Once the tee shot has been negotiated, a small undulating green is the next target, set on a plateau with deep rough either side catching a wayward second shot. And you?re not guaranteed a birdie if you hit it close either, because both the subtle and obvious undulations of the green could catch you out if the concentration is not quite there.

16
Par 3, Length 137m

From the championship tee position, the hole plays a deceptive 144 metres in length, generally straight into the prevailing south-westerly. From here, players are offered an excellent view of the green, situated amongst the wetlands, with water short, right and long. An alternative tee location forward and right of the championship tee makes the hole play around 125 metres in length, but greatly changes the angle into the green, and requires a full water-carry tee shot. The green setting is nothing short of spectacular, with the wetlands framing the front, right and back of the green, and an area recently re-vegetated with native plants framing the left hand side.

17
Par 4, Length 382m

At the inside corner of the dog-leg, an existing hollow has been converted into a fearsome pot bunker with a sandy waste area located beyond. Typically out of reach of the average member, longer hitters wishing to cut the dog-leg must carry this bunker at a considerable risk, as it is virtually impossible to reach the green with a recovery shot. Although a wide green, the strong front left bunker guards the shallower left portion, whilst the deeper, right portion is trapped at the right rear. Grassy hollows back and left make recovery difficult for shots slightly off target.

18
Par 5, Length 494m

The tee shot must find fairway between water and sand, whilst the shorter shot is afforded a more generous landing area. But it is the second half of the hole where most decisions must be made. From a long drive, the green is reachable in two, but cross bunkers must be negotiated by shaping the ball left to right or by carrying them. The shorter hitter can choose whether to advance the ball as far as possible and risk finding a cross bunker, or lay up sufficiently short and accept a more difficult shot to the green. The green is protected by bunkers to the right and front left, and the ever present lake along the left side. The green itself is large with a great variety of pin positions, and some significant contouring that can test one?s putting skill at the end of the round.

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Grange Golf Club (East)

White Sands Drive
Grange, SA, 5023
Australia

Region: 4. Adelaide

Grange Golf Club (East)

The Grange Golf Club is one of South Australia's premier sporting venues with two internationally rated 18 hole championship golf courses and an award winning function centre. The Grange Golf Club set out to build a golf course that would equal the best there was to offer in South Australia, and this has been well and truly achieved.

The Grange Golf Club is one of South Australia's premier sporting venues with two internationally rated 18 hole championship golf courses and an award winning function centre.

The members of The Grange Golf Club set out to build a golf course that would equal the best there was to offer in South Australia . That has been well and truly achieved. Many champion golfers have enjoyed the challenge of The Grange.

The Grange Golf Club has a very special place in Australian Golf history, having hosted the 1976 West Lakes Classic which was won by a 21 year old trainee professional named Greg Norman.

We hope as you play this magnificent but challenging layout that some of the magic that Greg Norman found rubs off on you.

The East Course is currently being remastered by Greg Norman Golf Course Design, with a view to totally reconstruct the course with an exciting new layout to commence in mid 2011.

Course Information

Par: 72
ACR: 72
Length (m): 6344
Architect: Vern Morcom
Design Year: 1956
Top 100: 47

Playing Tips

1
Par 4, Length 396m

This dogleg right is known as Greg Norman's hole - not because of a famous shot he hit here, but simply because it was the opening hole on the course where he won his first tournament. The player has to either move the ball from left to right off the tee or carry across the bunker that guards the inside of the dogleg. From the middle of the fairway the player is confronted with a relatively long second to a big green with a significant bunker on the right, catching the pushed shot.

2
Par 4, Length 356m

Shorter than the first this hole does the opposite, turning from right to left, giving the advantage to the player who can easily draw the ball. The best place to get at the flag without confronting the bunker on the right of the green is from the left corner of the fairway. There is, however, a fairway bunker on the left to catch those who turn the ball too far. Neither long nor difficult, the second is a hole that rewards those who can hit a precise short iron approach.

3
Par 3, Length 151m

This par three is proof that a 'one-shot' hole does not have to be long to be difficult. Surrounded by bunkers, the long thin green asks for the ball to be moved from left to right and the club selection can vary widely depending on whether the pin is cut just over the front bunker or way in the back of the green.

4
Par 5, Length 475m

The first of the long holes, the fourth demands a tee shot shaped from left to right to get around fairway bunkers on the right corner of the hole. If the drive is long enough, the player may be confronted with the possibility of reaching the green in two, however, trees on the right and water on the left will force most to lay back perhaps eighty metres short of the green and pitch from there.

5
Par 4, Length 245m

The fifth is a short or, at a stretch a medium length, par four where the driver must avoid the fairway bunkers to the right of the fairway. The pitch to the green is not as demanding as the similar length shot to the second because the greenside bunkers don't pinch in quite as much to the putting surface.

6
Par 5, Length 515m

This long par five is a fine hole. The drive is relatively simple with only a fairway bunker on the left to catch the unwary, but the second shot must avoid or carry the fairway bunkers on the right side of the fairway. These bunkers do a perfect job of confronting the player with the type of decision that can make par five holes such fascinating propositions.

7
Par 4, Length 407m

A long, straight par four where the whole of the left side of the tee shot is threatened by a lake that drowns its share of hooks. When this hole plays into the wind it is probably the most demanding tee shot on the whole course. A bunker protects the green short and left, with another cut into the right edge of the putting surface, thus creating a demanding second even for those that successfully hit the fairway.

8
Par 3, Length 170m

The eighth is a long par three with big green, making for a less demanding target than the shorter third. Water on the left side of the hole shouldn't be in play.

9
Par 4, Length 361m

Like the first and the fifth holes, the last on this outward nine moves from left to right, and because the hole doglegs too close to the corner the player must move the ball significantly if the trees through the fairway are to be avoided. The second shot is reasonably demanding with water on the left and the green guarded by a bunker on the right.

10
Par 4, Length 394m

This is one of the most difficult par fours on the course, but much of this arises from a dogleg that again bends too close to the tee. The longest players must hit a hard draw around the dogleg, or blast the ball across the corner of the hole to find the fairway and avoid trees. The shot into the green is probably going to be the longest of the day, but importantly the size of the green reflects the difficulty of the shot. A bunker protects the left of the green, but the shot out it oughtn't be too difficult - as long as you keep the face open and slide it under the ball.

11
Par 4, Length 330m

This short par four is perfectly sandwiched between two long holes, and turns subtly from left to right. The fairway bunker on the left of the tee shot ought to be of minimal concern but the pitch to the green needs to be well controlled. There are two large bunkers at the green - one left and one right - and if the flag is close to either you had better pay attention.

12
Par 4, Length 351m

This is a wonderful hole, played over the most undulating piece of ground on the whole course. A new tee, thirty metres behind the old one, has meant the best players now have to drive the ball down the fairway - as opposed to over the trees on the left. It has also meant fears of driving the ball too far through the fairway and into the trees are all but removed. The second shot, usually with a middle or long iron, is perhaps the most attractive on the whole course.

13
Par 5, Length 527m

The longest hole on the course is a double dogleg, first turning left then back to the right. There are fairway bunkers to the left of the tee shot to avoid then, if successful, another further up the fairway which the player has to hit left of or over for their second. Only the real 'smashers' of the game can get anywhere near this hole in two shots and most find themselves pitching to the green from about a hundred metres for their third.

14
Par 3, Length 157m

This may be the most demanding of all the short holes although it is by no means the longest. The tee shot demands at least a middle or long iron to a green well protected by sand. The ideal shape will be from left to right, but anything long, high and well struck will get the job done. Unlike the eighth this hole can intimidate the better player into hitting a poor shot because it's surrounded by so much sand.

15
Par 4, Length 403m

If the seventh isn't the most difficult driving hole then this one is. Like that hole it's straight and a bunker on the right of the drive will trap the push or slice. This hazard is no place to recommend, and a four from there is a real feat. After a good drive the second is probably going to be a similar length shot to the one off the tee at the previous hole. The bunker to the left of the green isn't recommended either and fours are well earned here.

16
Par 5, Length 484m

This is a narrow par five where there is, obviously, a premium on accuracy from the tee. The right side of the fairway is probably the preferred one, but anything on the short grass is good. There are trees short and left of the green that ought to be avoided. The 16th is the shortest of the par fives but perhaps it is the most interesting and it takes two fine shots to hit the green.

17
Par 3, Length 203m

One of the longest par threes in the country and a hole that is ideal for this time of the round. Only a perfect two or three iron - OK, Tiger could get there with a four or a five - will suffice here. Anyone who gets a shot here ought to be playing it as a par four because it's a serious hole.

18
Par 4, Length 322m

The finishing hole is somewhat unusual being a fairly short par four. The fairway bends from left to right so a fade is the perfect shot to hit off the tee. The green is not the biggest on the course and the left bunker is definitely not the place to miss.

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Grange Golf Club (West)

White Sands Drive
Grange, SA, 5023
Australia

Region: 4. Adelaide

Grange Golf Club (West)

The Grange Golf Club is one of South Australia's premier sporting venues with two internationally rated 18 hole championship golf courses and an award winning function centre. The Grange Golf Club set out to build a golf course that would equal the best there was to offer in South Australia, and this has been well and truly achieved.

The Grange Golf Club is one of South Australia's premier sporting venues with two internationally rated 18 hole championship golf courses and an award winning function centre.

The members of The Grange Golf Club set out to build a golf course that would equal the best there was to offer in South Australia . That has been well and truly achieved. Many champion golfers have enjoyed the challenge of The Grange.

The Grange Golf Club has a very special place in Australian Golf history, having hosted the 1976 West Lakes Classic which was won by a 21 year old trainee professional named Greg Norman.

We hope as you play this magnificent but challenging layout that some of the magic that Greg Norman found rubs off on you.

The West Course has recently been remastered by Michael Clayton Golf Design with a $1.6 Million redevelopment, completed in 2007

Course Information

Par: 72
ACR: 73
Length (m): 6220
Architect: Vern Morcom
Design Year: 1956
Top 100: 44

Playing Tips

1
Par 5, Length 457m

The opening hole is a short par five easily reached in two shots by the longer hitters but the green is set to reward the player who has driven down the right side of the wide fairway and close to the sandy waste ground that dominates the edge of the hole. Those playing the hole as a three-shotter will find a significantly easier pitch from the right edge of the fairway and the shot over the front right bunker from the left half of the fairway is one perhaps best avoided so early in the round.

2
Par 4, Length 324m

This is a short par four with the tee on the edge of the big sandy wasteland that forms a big part of this hole as well as the one to follow. A bunker in the centre of the fairway must be considered for those capable of driving 260 metres from the back tees. The pitch into the long green is best played from the right half of the hole and for those who have driven left the left hand greenside bunkers are something to play over.

3
Par 4, Length 423m

The 3rd hole was changed quite dramatically by removing trees and opening up the spectacular sandy wasteland that was formerly used as a site for mining sand. A long bunker is cut along the right side of the driving area but there is a wide fairway stretching far to the left for the less adventurous to play into with safety. A deep bunker on the left side of the green gives those who have played close to the fairway bunker a clearer approach.

4
Par 3, Length 191m

Prior to the changes to the course there were three medium length par three's (the 4th, 12th and 14th holes) and it was decided to add the extra dimension of a long one shotter. This was the logical place to incorporate such a hole and from the back tee to a pin cut as the back of the green the golfer is asked to play a shot of over 200 metres. The long green allows for the hole to be played at varying distances and from the back of the old tee to the difficult pin behind the bunker in the front left the shot is only 135 metres. Generally however from the back tee this hole is a demanding long iron shot.

5
Par 5, Length 499m

The second of the two opening nine par fives is much longer than the first hole and this one takes two mighty shots to reach in two. A fairway bunker replaced the pine trees that used to line the right of the hole and block the view of the green from the left third of the fairway and that makes for a much superior hole.

6
Par 4, Length 409m

Here is the second longest par four on the course although the 17th is probably more difficult. The drive plays to the top of the hill or just over and the downhill second is to a green guarded by bunkers left and right but nonetheless one that favours a drive played to the left half of the fairway.

7
Par 4, Length 304m

Formerly this was a longer par four but the suggestion was to shorten the hole and incorporate a hole where players had a number of choices from the tee. With the green 285 metres from the tee, some have a chance to reach it if the wind is behind but the threat is the dreaded forty metre bunkers shot from left of the green if the drive is misplayed. For those playing with a shorter club from the tee a fairway bunker a couple of hundred metres from the tee suggests the ideal line into the most difficult pin position in the back left corner of the green.

8
Par 3, Length 138m

There is always much to be said for short holes where a good player can make a four with one bad swing and the highest markers can make a two with one good one. This is achievable on only the shortest of holes and they must be protected by hazards that induce a little fear and make a three unlikely if the green is missed.

9
Par 4, Length 388m

The front nine finishes with a hole turning to the left and whilst there is little undulation to add to its challenge the best drive hugs the left side of the fairway and from there the green opens up to an approach that the scratch player would play with a middle to short iron depending on the wind.

10
Par 5, Length 484m

The par five tenth is a relatively straight hole but a bunker thirty metres short of the green on the right and a green protected by a deep bunker cutting right up into the left edge of the putting surface dictates that there are many options from back on the fairway. The ideal shot is a long high draw (for a right hander) that carries the short bunker and runs onto the green. For those laying back clearly the option is to play short of the right bunker to open up the left half of the green. Those straying to the left of the sand face one of the more difficult pitch shots on the course.

11
Par 4, Length 382m

The 11th is a medium length par four turning left and the fairway bunker embedded into the top of the rise 230 metres from the tee is the single hazard to be avoided but the closer one plays to the sand the better the line into the green. The bunker carry is 245 metres and whilst achievable for the longer hitters only the most desperate would take that challenge and the perfect tee shot finds the rise opposite the end of the bunker and the shot down to the green from there is only a short iron.

12
Par 3, Length 161m

The first of a pair of medium length par threes on the back nine plays to a quite long but narrow green with bunkers on both sides. The more intimidating bunker runs all the way along the left side of the green and this short hole is simply asking for a good shot. It is not particularly difficult unless the wind is up but saving a par if the green is missed is not easy.

13
Par 5, Length 501m

The tee shot at this par five must negotiate a central fairway bunker 245 metres from the championship tee and the option is to play over, left or right of the sand. The left is perhaps the better line into the green because of a fairway bunker further along on the right that influences the second shot. Certainly the easiest pitch into the small green is from the left.

14
Par 3, Length 158m

The final par three is a medium length uphill hole with a tier cutting through the middle of the small target. A deep bunker on the right makes the pins cut on the right of the green the most intimidating to access.

15
Par 4, Length 374m

The beginning of the run home, the 15th, a medium length hole, is the first of a quartet of par fours of varying length and challenge. A pair of fairway bunkers, one short down the left and another further down on the right determine the club and line from the tee and the green is best approached from the right half of the fairway especially when the pin is cut up into the back left corner of the green.

16
Par 4, Length 384m

Longer than the previous hole and running in the opposite direction the shape of the hole favours a tee shot moving from right to left. The fairway bunker sitting into the left corner of the driving area protects the ideal line into the green.

17
Par 4, Length 415m

This is the best hole on the course and whilst it is probably also the most demanding its difficulty is only one determinate of its quality. The fairway is lined with pines making this a beautiful looking hole and the natural movement of the ground makes for exhilarating golf. A drive down the right half of the fairway opens a clear view of the green but a small dune further blocks the view of the green for those who have driven left. A deep bunker lines the right side of the green and this par four asks for a pair of perfectly played strokes.

18
Par 4, Length 348m

The finisher is a drive and pitch affair not unlike the closers nearby at Kooyonga and Royal Adelaide but it cannot be taken for granted. The pitch from the right side of the fairway looks and plays quite differently than the shot from the left and when the pin is in the most difficult place in the back right corner the drive down the left is truly advantaged because of the bunker cut right up into the right half of the green. The undulating green tests nervous putters at the end of the round and it prove - as does the ultimate drive and pitch finisher at St Andrews - that short fours are well capable of extracting mental and physical mistakes from the unwary.

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Kooyonga Golf Club

May Terrace
Lockleys, SA, 5032
Australia

Region: 4. Adelaide

Kooyonga Golf Club

Kooyonga Golf Club is a wonderful example of a championship golf course in the rich sandy soiled area just 15 minutes from the central business district of Adelaide. The course layout is testing but fair. An abundance of natural timber defines the narrow, undulating fairways culminating in well protected greens whose pace and subtle slopes require skill and demand respect.

Kooyonga Golf Club is a wonderful example of a championship golf course in the rich sandy soiled area just 15 minutes from the central business district of Adelaide. Adelaide is one of the smaller capital cities in Australia yet boasts a wide selection of outstanding golf courses in a relatively small area. In fact within a 10 minute radius of Kooyonga lies a number of other golf gems including the world rated Royal Adelaide Golf Club and highly rated The Grange and Glenelg Golf Clubs.

The Club's history has inevitably been linked with great world events, but perhaps more than any other factor, chance has played the greatest of all parts in shaping the fortunes of Kooyonga.

The origins of Kooyonga Golf Club can be traced back to a day in 1922 when a train strike caused Mr. H.C. (Cargie) Rymill to take a tram rather than a train to Henley Beach. A 'For Sale' sign on a tract of swamp and sand dune country known as May's Paddock prompted him to break that journey and on a closer inspection he knew that he had discovered the ideal site for a magnificent golf course.

Kooyonga enjoys a current Australian ranking of 14 and this is testament to the quality of the golf course. Five Australian Opens and three Australian Amateur Championships have been decided at Kooyonga as well as numerous South Australian Opens and Amateur Championships. Additionally the course has been the host of the US PGA Tour Nationwide Jacob's Creek Open further exposing Kooyonga to the world.

One of the interesting features of Kooyonga are the various elevation changes which exist throughout the 18 holes. From the outside and until you actually play the golf course Kooyonga appears to be built on a relatively flat parcel of land. What is in fact the case is a series of rises and hollows upon which some wonderful golf holes have been constructed. Exacting approach shots are demanded on a number of holes which on the scorecard look relatively short. Par on any of these holes is a good score.

Kooyonga is not a long course—in fact none of the par 4 holes extend over 400 metres but what it lacks in length is more than made up for by its clever design. A number of reachable par 5 holes can help ones scorecard but any errant shot will be punished by the prevalence of native trees flanking most fairways. The greens at Kooyonga are generally small and firm and often framed with bunkers destined to catch an even slightly errant shot.

Course Information

Par: 72
ACR: 73
Length (m): 6160
Architect: Herbert Lockett Rymill
Design Year: 1924
Top 100: 26

Playing Tips

1
Par 5, Length 495m

A gentle dog leg right welcomes the player. A good drive left of centre to avoid fairway bunkering along the right hand side will give longer hitters an opportunity to go for the green in two or lay up with a long iron. The shot to the raised green is hard to judge and, if to the left or long, can leave a difficult up-and-down.

2
Par 5, Length 451m

A shortish par 5 where a solid drive will make this hole reachable in 2 shots. A tight line for the second shot to the area between the two bunkers guarding the green offers a definite birdie chance.

3
Par 3, Length 180m

A tough par 3 surrounded by bunkers on both sides and two grassy hollows over the back. Club selection is difficult because the tee is protected from the southerly winds that can blow very strongly.

4
Par 4, Length 355m

This hole has a blind drive to a narrow fairway with an out of bounds on the left. You can use anything from a long iron to driver to get over the hill. The challenging mid to short iron second shot is to a small green well guarded by bunkers with a dangerous swale on the left side.

5
Par 4, Length 297m

A shortish par 4 with two big bunkers down the right hand side. Most players lay up at the neck of the fairway which leaves a short iron into a two tier green divided by a diagonal ridge. Bunkers guard the left side of the green.

6
Par 4, Length 373m

Fairway bunkers on the left side catch the long tee shot while the tall gums guarding the right hand side require an accurately placed drive. The blind second shot normally played upwind needs careful club selection. Deep bunkers are positioned front left and right of the green.

7
Par 3, Length 152m

A short hole with a green that has three levels. Any shot miss-hit or under-clubbed will end up in the front left bunker or down a deep slope front right of the green. An essential and satisfying green to hit but beware the long putt from the back to the lower level.

8
Par 4, Length 383m

The fairway which dog legs left, slopes severely to the right making it hard to hit. You are faced with a blind second shot with a mid to long iron depending on the wind. The green is very small, raised and has two well placed bunkers short left and right.

9
Par 5, Length 467m

Longer hitters will land their drives between the left fairway bunkers and the right hand side trees and burn. This will give you the opportunity to go for the green in two. The green is protected by a deep bunker front and a shallow bunker back left.

10
Par 4, Length 397m

This is the first of four demanding par 4 holes, and is the hardest hole on the back 9. A well hit accurate drive is needed with trees on both sides of the fairway. A long iron upwind is usually required with bunkers surrounding both sides of the green.

11
Par 4, Length 365m

A short par 4 with the tiger tee set up into a sand hill. A driver or three-wood will leave a short to mid iron into the green. One of the flatter greens on the course with a steep slope at the rear and bunkers guarding both sides.

12
Par 4, Length 356m

A slight dog leg left where a good tee shot is essential. A precision second shot is required to the elevated green which is small, undulating, and provides many difficult pin positions. Better to err on the short side with the shot, rather than be over the back!

13
Par 4, Length 389m

The most straight forward hole on the course and one where a long drive over a rise is well recommended. One of the few greens not built up but watch club selection as there is fairway short of the green you can't see. A bunker short right and grassy hollow over the bunker will catch any wayward shot to the right.

14
Par 3, Length 145m

Perhaps the signature hole of Kooyonga. This wind blown par 3 has a sheltered tee, and an exposed green, rendering club selection exquisitely difficult. Deep bunkers surround the green with a steep slope over the back.

15
Par 3, Length 210m

One of the hardest par 3's you will ever play. The green is elevated with severe slopes off both sides and at the rear. Two bunkers guard the left side while on the right, bunkers extend back from the green a long way. A par is well earned here.

16
Par 5, Length 507m

The most difficult par 5 on the course. A good drive that avoids the left hand bunker will give you a chance to go for the green in two. To lay up on the left side with the second shot will reward the accurate golfer with a short shot to a narrow green, well surrounded by bunkers.

17
Par 4, Length 353m

A stunning hole with a gentle dog leg to the left over a rolling hill. A good drive will clear the deep bunker positioned on the left side of the fairway. This will leave a short to mid iron shot with water covering the front right part of the green. Anywhere on the green is acceptable.

18
Par 4, Length 338m

A short but tight dog leg to the left, where long hitters can take on the corner bunkers. The reward is a short pitch to a flat green with bunkers left and right. Laying up will leave you with a blind shot with a short or mid iron.

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Mount Osmond Golf Club

60 Mount Osmond Road
Mt Osmond, SA, 5064
Australia

Region: 4. Adelaide

Mount Osmond Golf Club

South Australia's most scenic golf course is sighted on the summit of the low mountain it takes its name from; barely a 10-minute drive from Adelaide's CBD. The Mt Osmond Golf Club provides unique views from many of the tees, fairways and greens. Whether out across the plains to Gulf St Vincent, or back towards the sweeping Mount Lofty Ranges, the views add greatly to the pleasure of playing a challenging and superbly designed and maintained course.

South Australia's most scenic golf course is sited on the summit of the low mountain from which it takes its name - barely a 10-minute drive from Adelaide's CBD. The Mt Osmond Golf Club provides unique views from many of the tees, fairways and greens. Whether out across the plains to Gulf St Vincent, or back towards the sweeping Mount Lofty Ranges, the views add greatly to the pleasure of playing a challenging and superbly designed and maintained course.

Relaxing in the club's distinctive, charming and historic 'English Manor' clubrooms is the perfect finish to every enjoyable round.

Course Information

Par: 71
ACR: 70
Length (m): 5698
Architect: Unknown, Tony Cashmore
Design Year: 1927, 1996 (rework)

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Royal Adelaide Golf Club

328 Tapleys Hill Road
Seaton, SA, 5023
Australia

Region: 4. Adelaide

Royal Adelaide Golf Club

Royal Adelaide Golf Club is widely acknowledged as ranking with the best in Australia and located less than 20 minutes drive from the city. Despite many alterations made since the first blow was struck on it 98 years ago, it retains its distinctive character of a comparatively open links course.

The Adelaide Golf Club (in 1923 it became The Royal Adelaide Golf Club) was founded in 1892. In its early years it played in the north Parklands of Adelaide and later in North Glenelg. It purchased its present links at Seaton in 1904, and the current layout was officially opened on 30th June 1906.

Cargie Rymill was the driving force in preparing the links for the first Open Australian Championship at Seaton in 1910. Nine Australian Opens have been decided at Royal Adelaide, the latest in 1998. In 1926 Dr Alister Mackenzie visited Royal Adelaide to advise on its design and his initial reaction to the links was:-

"One finds a most delightful combination of sand dunes and fir trees, a most unusual combination even at the best seaside courses. No seaside courses that I have seen possess such magnificent sand craters as those at Royal Adelaide."

A combination of testing short holes with ball catching bunkering along with a number of testing longer holes ensures that all shots must be carefully thought out to register a good score for the 18 holes. From the back markers it now measures 6,619 metres and the "open spaces" have been gently contoured and bunkered to provide an intellectual and physical challenge to all players whether from the more friendly Members' tees or the more demanding Championship markers.

Course Information

Par: 73
ACR: 75
Length (m): 6603
Architect: H.L. Rymill and C.L. Gardiner (with significant modifications by Alister Mackenzie in 1926), Renaissance Golf Design (2014)
Design Year: 1904
Top 100: 14

Playing Tips

1
Par 4, Length 348m

The fairway of this quite short opening hole curves between some gentle mounds on each side. In the mounds on the right side are two bunkers clearly visible from the tee. The long hitting player will need to avoid the quite long grass on either side of this fairway and to take care not to go into a tongue of rough extending across the fairway 280 metres from the tee. The green lies obliquely to the line of play and is guarded by a bunker on its front left side. As a south westerly wind is often assisting this hole, players may have difficulty, even with a short iron, placing their second shots close to the flag.

2
Par 5, Length 507m

The fairway bunker on the left of the fairway is 270 metres from the tee. The hole has a very attractive large greenside bunker on the right 30 metres short of the green and two smaller bunkers on the left adjacent to the green. It is the direction and strength of the wind which will determine whether a birdie four is a realistic expectation. The railway line which extends down the left side of this hole is an integral part of the course. An errant shot coming to rest among the sleepers must be played as it lies or a penalty taken.

3
Par 4, Length 266m

Often regarded as one of the best holes at Seaton, this is the only hole which remains faithful to the original design of Dr Alister Mackenzie. It has a green which can be described as being "leg of mutton" in shape. It has an oblique ridge on the left, while on the right is a knoll on the side of the green. Always surrounded by dense grass and rushes, it offers the possibility of an eagle 2 to the brave but with the possibility of a quite disastrous score. Norman Von Nida once took a nine while more recently in 1989 Colin Montgomerie required eight.

4
Par 4, Length 410m

The crater which lies in front of the club tees presents little challenge to the Championship players. A new tee has been formed some 40 metres back. From this the player has a blind shot to an undulating fairway. Pine trees guard both sides of the crater and 240 metres from the tee on the left are two quite deep bunkers. To deter the adventurous there is another pot bunker a further 30 metres on. The right side of the fairway is heavily grassed and the fairway narrows sharply 280 metres from the tee. The green is relatively flat with a bunker on the left but there are some deceptive mounds on the right from which an accurate chip can be difficult.

5
Par 4, Length 420m

A new tee 40 metres behind its predecessor brings the two existing right side bunkers into play as they are now 250 and 286 metres from the tee. The left side of this hole has been narrowed firstly by some quite deep grass and by increased mounding between this and the neighbouring sixth fairway. In these mounds are four bunkers which are quite invisible from the tee. The furthest of these is placed 290 metres from the tee and it narrows the neck of the fairway. The bold player with an assisting wind may attempt to play through this neck and be left with a wedge to the green. Prudence may dictate playing short of the bunkers. This presents a longer shot to the green which has a deep bunker in its right front edge.

6
Par 4, Length 420m

This has always been a formidable hole from the members tee particularly when played into the generally prevailing wind. A new tee has added some additional teeth to the hole as the required tee shot from this championship tee will require a carry in excess of 230 metres. To the right are further mounds and some testing grass and rushes and another bunker 281 metres from the tee. The green is generous in size. There is a deceptive slope from the back of the green. Care is required with any putt from above the hole. Two bunkers on each side of the green complete a very fine hole.

7
Par 3, Length 165m

The green is surrounded by small bunkers in the front and on each side while at the back are deep grassy hollows. This green was laid down when the course was first developed. It was then approached from a different direction, but the tee was later placed behind the sixth green from which members still play. A new tee has been made extending this hole to 167 metres . A head wind will add an additional challenge to a hole which is an icon at Seaton.

8
Par 4, Length 358m

The player can choose to play short of a tongue of rough extending across the fairway from the right, 237 metres out. This side is reinforced by some steep mounds and a deep bunker. The left side is also mounded with two pot bunkers 240 and 260 metres from the tee. Alternatively the choice is a longer tee shot over the peninsula of rough to a narrow strip of fairway. This would leave a very short pitch to the green which slopes away sharply on the left and behind. The front right is protected by two mounds and a bunker.

9
Par 5, Length 495m

A newly constructed bunker is 275 metres from the tee on the left, from which a gentle mound extends across the fairway to thick rough and a small stand of swamp oaks. On the right, the mounding has been increased and regular watering of the rough has encouraged thick growth, all of which enhances the two deep bunkers. Both sides of the approach to this hole are lined with bunkers which lie in wait for any wayward second shot by the player who may hope to get up in two. The green has a quite definite step in it and a putt from almost any direction requires close attention.

10
Par 4, Length 345m

The fairway to this quite short par 4 is angled to the right over the hill. A pine tree on the left and long grass and rushes on the right will punish a wayward drive. At the bottom of the hill there is further area of thick rough to hinder a drive of more than 250 metres. A subtle choice of club and line is required to be in a position to play to this green. The green has an inverted saucer shape with some very demanding pin placements. An accurately placed second shot is most desirable.

11
Par 4, Length 353m

This hole is regarded by most as Royal Adelaide's signature hole and still plays as Alister Mackenzie designed it in the 1920s. A strong tee shot is required to ensure an easier second shot onto the green set within a sand crater. Three fairway bunkers make this task more difficult. An interesting carry commencing 86 metres from the front of the green and features many native grasses. The green is protected by both a front left and a front right sand bunker and is framed by a stand of pine trees on the rear sand dunes.

12
Par 3, Length 205m

This hole is played from an elevated tee. The green has gently undulating, grassed surrounds leading to low-lying swamps. A small bunker is on its front left hand edge. Into the prevailing westerly or southerly wind this is a testing par.

13
Par 4, Length 395m

The hole is an acute dog-leg to the left. The left or inner side of the fairway has a heavily grassed verge separating it from low sandhills. The outer side has low mounds which are again well grassed. There is a bunker 30 metres short of the green and a left greenside bunker. The green has a pronounced slope to the right. A long well placed drive is essential to facilitate the playing of this very fine hole.

14
Par 4, Length 445m

The new championship tee is situated on the far side of the railway line. This results in a magnificent championship hole where a 248 metre drive will be needed to carry the edge of a cluster of bunkers on the right. The second shot is played through a gap in the pine trees to an elevated green guarded by three bunkers. A deep swale before the green and another on the left side of the green complete a most demanding hole.

15
Par 5, Length 464m

The stand of pines on either side present little difficulty to top players. The left side of the fairway is heavily trapped with a succession of bunkers which would require a carry of 270 metres but such a line would also encounter deep grass. Another bunker is also situated on the right with a mound across the fairway. Shorter and to the right there is punishing rough. Although a short par 5, the drive must be well placed. The green is lightly trapped with shallow bunkers.

16
Par 3, Length 165m

This rather disarming hole is destined to test even the straightest hitter. The green which has some slight, but treacherous slopes, is complemented by a swale on the right and two bunkers on the left. It is a much admired but deceiving short hole.

17
Par 4, Length 421m

More often than not this hole has the assistance of the wind. It is a potential birdie four or eagle three. The bunker on the right requires a carry of 255 metres. A very deep bunker on the left is 7 metres further on. A drive placed between these will be aided by the run you receive via the slope. The fairway here is narrowed by deep couch grass rough. The green is two tiered with a greenside bunker in front and another on the left. Any shot missing the green will most likely find more troublesome couch grass.

18
Par 4, Length 383m

This hole will again require an accurate tee shot. The left side has three vicious little pot bunkers requiring a carry of 250 metres while on the right a deep fairway bunker is 230 metres from the tee. The rough on each side is troublesome and the fairway narrow. Nevertheless a long straight drive will be rewarded with a short shot of 80 or so metres to the green. There are two bunkers on the right of the green and a lateral water hazard on the left. This has been deepened and widened and planted with rushes. The slope between the green and the hazard is closely mown. Any shot to the left of the green may be in peril.

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Sandy Creek Golf Club (formerly Gawler)

Williamstown Road
Sandy Creek, SA, 5350
Australia

Region: 4. Adelaide

Sandy Creek Golf Club (formerly Gawler)

The Sandy Creek Golf Club is an 18 hole, Par 72 course measuring a total of 6095m. The course features four Par 3s, ten Par 4s and four Par 5s.

Course Information

Par: 72
ACR: 72
Length (m): 6095
Architect: Various
Design Year: 1975

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Tanunda Pines Golf Club

Golf Links Road
Tanunda, SA, 5352
Australia

Region: 4. Adelaide

Tanunda Pines Golf Club

Tanunda Pines weaves its fairways among 100 year old gnarly gums alive with what seems to be every variety of native parrot in the nation. The course itself has surprisingly sandy loam as a base. This makes for excellent, tightly packed fairways and fast greens. Tee shots demand technique as much as power, approach shots that employ the old grey matter, tight fairways and fast greens- it's got the lot.

Tanunda Pines weaves its fairways among 100 year old gnarly gums alive with what seems to be every variety of native parrot in the nation. The course itself has surprisingly sandy loam as a base. This makes for excellent, tightly packed fairways and fast greens.

Tee shots demand technique as much as power, approach shots that employ the old grey matter, tight fairways and fast greens- it's got the lot.

Course Information

Par: 72
ACR: 72
Length (m): 6127
Architect:
Design Year:

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Accommodation

About the Destination

Adelaide Location Map

Situated along the Australian Southern Coastline adjacent to the Gulf St Vincent is Adelaide City. Best known for its vast array of activities, Adelaide is loved by visitors and residents alike as there is ‘always something happening’. Whether it is a music festival, cultural exhibition, sporting event or market day, Adelaide is a vibrant Australian hub of activity.

Adelaide is one of the smaller capital cities in Australia yet boasts a wide selection of outstanding golf courses in a relatively small area. In fact within a 15 minute radius of the City Centre lie a number of golf gems including the world rated Royal Adelaide Golf Club, Kooyonga Golf Club, and highly rated The Grange and Glenelg Golf Clubs.

Royal Adelaide Golf Club is one of Australia’s oldest private golf courses founded in 1892. After a couple of moves, the golf club finally opened in its current location in Seaton in 1906. Nine Australian Opens have been decided at Royal Adelaide, the latest in 1998. World legendary golf course architect Dr Alister Mackenzie advised on its design in 1926.

The course boasts a combination of testing short holes with a number of challenging longer holes framed with carefully placed ball catching bunkering. From the back markers it now measures 6,619 metres and the "open spaces" have been gently contoured and bunkered to provide an intellectual and physical challenge to all players whether from the friendlier Members' tees or the more demanding Championship markers.

Kooyonga Golf Club is a wonderful example of a championship golf course that benefits from the rich sandy soiled area it is located within. In 2009 Kooyonga Golf Club celebrates its eighty-fifth anniversary and is currently ranked 14 in Australia. This is testament to the quality of the golf course.

Five Australian Opens and three Australian Amateur Championships have been decided at Kooyonga as well as numerous South Australian Opens and Amateur Championships. Additionally the course has been the host of the US PGA Tour Nationwide Jacob's Creek Open further exposing Kooyonga to the world.

Kooyonga is not a long course—in fact none of the par 4 holes extend over 400 metres but what it lacks in length is more than made up for by its clever design. A number of reachable par 5 holes can help ones scorecard but any errant shot will be punished by the prevalence of native trees flanking most fairways.

With two 18-hole championship courses to choose from, and an award winning function centre The Grange Golf Club offers a memorable golf experience for any golf enthusiast. The members of The Grange Golf Club set out to build a golf course that would equal the best there was to offer in South Australia. That has been well and truly achieved. Many champion golfers have enjoyed the challenge of The Grange. The Grange Golf Club has a very special place in Australian Golf history, having hosted the 1976 West Lakes Classic which was won by a 21 year old trainee professional named Greg Norman.

Glenelg Golf Club is a private golf club located adjacent to the Adelaide Airport and only a short distance from the Adelaide CBD. In recent years, the club embarked on an extensive redevelopment project to improve the quality and playability of the golf course, under the expert guidance of Golf Course Architect, Neil Crafter and with the assistance of Bob Tuohy.

Glenelg has been the site of many State and National championships throughout its history, including the Australian Amateur Championships (Men and Women), Men's Interstate Series, Australian Junior Championships (Boys and Girls) and South Australian Open's and PGA's.

Links Lady Bay can be found on the beautiful Fleurieu Peninsula just over an hours drive from Adelaide. With stunning views of the coastline and ocean, The Links Lady Bay Golf course offers golfers smooth and subtle greens, long undulating fairways, strategically placed bunkers and water hazards.

It has all the characteristics of many of the famous links courses in Scotland and Ireland. Prevailing winds, gently undulating couch fairways, classic bunkering, strategic burns and subtle Bent greens will make you feel like you're playing in the British Open!

Designed by Jack Newton, Graeme Grant and John Spencer, Links Lady Bay is a true St Andrews style sand based links course that challenges golfers at all levels.

Other things to do in Adelaide

Adelaide’s favourite precincts to explore include North Terrace in the city centre where you will find museums and art galleries, Rundle Mall, Adelaide Central Market, Norwood which is home to charming café’s and boutique shops, and Adelaide’s most popular beach destination Glenelg which is just 15 minutes from the city centre. If it is shopping you are after, then you will love King William Road in Unley. This is just a small sample of the areas in Adelaide that will make you want to come back for more.

Of course, not to be missed are the famous South Australian wine regions just over an hour drive from Adelaide – The Barossa Valley and McLaren Vale.

Useful Facts and Figures

Below are some useful facts and figures for the Adelaide Region. Use these to work out the best time to visit this region.

Month

Min Temp (C/F)

Max Temp (C/F)

Sunrise

Sunset

Avg Rainfall (mm)

Jan

20/69

34/93 

6.20am 

8.30pm 

20 

Feb

20/69

33/91

6.50am 

8.10pm 

20 

Mar

18/64

31/88 

7.15am 

7.35pm 

25 

Apr

14/58

26/79 

6.40am 

5.50pm 

40 

May

12/54

21/70 

7.00am 

5.20pm 

65 

Jun

11/52

18/64 

7.20am 

5.10pm 

70 

Jul

9/47

17/62 

7.20am 

5.20pm 

70 

Aug

10/49

20/68 

6.50am 

5.45pm 

60 

Sep

11/52

21/70 

6.20am 

6.05pm 

50 

Oct

13/55

24/76 

5.30am 

6.30pm 

45 

Nov

17/63

28/82 

6.00am 

8.00pm 

30 

Dec

17/62

29/84 

5.55am 

8.25pm 

25