Overview

This package provides the complete experience - five world class golf courses and wonderful hospitality, playing and staying on the famed Melbourne Sandbelt.

Three different dates are on offer for you to choose from:

  • commencing Mon 14 December, 2020;
  • commencing Mon 11 January, 2021; or
  • commencing Mon 18 January, 2021.

Your Melbourne Sandbelt experience includes:

  • Twin share accommodation in the historic Clubhouse at Victoria Golf Club (Mon - Thurs)
  • Two games of golf at The Royal Melbourne Golf Club - host of the 2019 Presidents Cup
  • One game of golf at Kingston Heath Golf Club - host of the 2020 Australian Open
  • One game of golf at Victoria Golf Club - host of the 2022 Australian Open
  • One game of golf at The Metropolitan Golf Club - host of the 2018 World Cup of Golf
  • Coach transfers to and from each Golf Club on the day of play
  • Breakfast at Victoria Golf Club each morning
  • A light lunch each day at Victoria Golf Club
  • Dinner at each club

The total package price is AUD$2,975.00 per person (twin share) or AUD$3,725.00 per person (single share). A deposit of $1,000.00 per person is required to secure your reservation with the balance due no later than 14 days prior to your trip. Please note, bookings are non-refundable unless a COVID-19 related government direction requires the cancellation of the event.

If you have any further queries, please feel free to contact us.

The GOLFSelect Travel Team


Itinerary Day-by-Day

Monday, 11 January 2021
Notes Check In
Check in at Victoria Golf Club
Coach Transfer
Transfer to Royal Melbourne Golf Club
Golf
The Royal Melbourne GC (East Course) () 
The East Course at Royal Melbourne spreads itself over 3 different paddocks and as a result contains a series of holes which are different to its more famous cousin - the West Course. The generally flatter land still provides a selection of contrasting holes which fit together to form an enjoyable 18 hole selection.
Dining Dinner
Enjoy dinner at Royal Melbourne Golf Club
Coach Transfer
Return to Victoria Golf Club
Accommodation
Victoria Golf Club   (Twin share accommodation in the historic Clubhouse) 
Victoria Golf Club is not only the home to one of Melbourne's best golf courses, but also has quality accommodation located within the clubhouse. This is a perfect base for exploring the famous Melbourne Sandbelt.
Tuesday, 12 January 2021
Dining Breakfast
Enjoy breakfast at Victoria Golf Club
Dining Lunch
Enjoy a light lunch at Victoria Golf Club
Coach Transfer
Transfer to Metropolitan Golf Club
Golf
The Metropolitan Golf Club () 
The Metropolitan Golf Club is one of Australia's premier golf courses. Tucked quietly in Melbourne's south eastern suburbs it is one of the renowned "sandbelt courses" and widely recognised as one of the finest golf courses in Australia. It has also been described as the Australian equivalent of Augusta National. The perfect fairways, marbletop greens and blindingly white bunkers all combine to offer a test of golf not seen previously in Australia. Metropolitan is a tough but fair test of golf.
Dining Dinner
Enjoy dinner at Metropolitan Golf Club
Coach Transfer
Return to Victoria Golf Club
Accommodation
Victoria Golf Club   
Victoria Golf Club is not only the home to one of Melbourne's best golf courses, but also has quality accommodation located within the clubhouse. This is a perfect base for exploring the famous Melbourne Sandbelt.
Wednesday, 13 January 2021
Dining Breakfast
Enjoy breakfast at Victoria Golf Club
Notes Morning of Leisure
Dining Lunch
Enjoy a light lunch at Victoria Golf Club
Golf
Victoria Golf Club () 
Victoria Golf Club is, in many ways, similar to its neighbour Royal Melbourne. Its layout challenges players of all standards - deep bunkers catch errant shots both at the greenside and off the tee and the greens can be lightning fast. Victoria has hosted a number of major tournaments including the 2010-2011 Masters, 2002 Australian Open, multiple Victorian Opens and other National tournaments.
Dining Dinner
Enjoy dinner at Victoria Golf Club
Accommodation
Victoria Golf Club   
Victoria Golf Club is not only the home to one of Melbourne's best golf courses, but also has quality accommodation located within the clubhouse. This is a perfect base for exploring the famous Melbourne Sandbelt.
Thursday, 14 January 2021
Dining Breakfast
Enjoy breakfast at Victoria Golf Club
Notes Morning of Leisure
Dining Lunch
Enjoy a light lunch at Victoria Golf Club
Coach Transfer
Transfer to Kingston Heath Golf Club
Golf
Kingston Heath Golf Club () 
Kingston Heath Golf Club is universally regarded as one of the best manicured courses in Australia and arguably the world. Its strategic bunkering and clever use of dips and hollows fools the non observant golfer and any deviation from the fairway is generally met with a challenging recovery. The course was built on a compact parcel of land resulting in some of the best short par 4's and world class par 3 holes.
Dining Dinner
Enjoy dinner at Kingston Heath Golf Club
Coach Transfer
Return to Victoria Golf Club
Accommodation
Victoria Golf Club   
Victoria Golf Club is not only the home to one of Melbourne's best golf courses, but also has quality accommodation located within the clubhouse. This is a perfect base for exploring the famous Melbourne Sandbelt.
Friday, 15 January 2021
Dining Breakfast
Enjoy breakfast at Victoria Golf Club
Notes Check Out
Check out at Victoria Golf Club and settle up any incidentals
Golf
The Royal Melbourne GC (West Course) () 
The Royal Melbourne Golf Club is a 36 hole private members club located in the heart of the world famous Melbourne Sandbelt golf region. The West Course is regularly rated as the number one rated golf course in Australia (and was recently ranked number 6 in the world) and was designed by world renowned golf course architect Dr Alistair MacKenzie. The natural peaks and troughs in the terrain have been used to maximum benefit with strategically designed and memorable holes throughout.
Coach Transfer
Transfer to Royal Melbourne Golf Club
Notes Own Arrangements
Make your own way to the airport or homeward bound

Golf Courses

Kingston Heath Golf Club

Kingston Road
Cheltenham, VIC, 3192
Australia

Region: Melbourne Sandbelt

Kingston Heath Golf Club

Kingston Heath Golf Club is universally regarded as one of the best manicured courses in Australia and arguably the world. Its strategic bunkering and clever use of dips and hollows fools the non observant golfer and any deviation from the fairway is generally met with a challenging recovery. The course was built on a compact parcel of land resulting in some of the best short par 4's and world class par 3 holes.

Kingston Heath Golf Club is one of Australia's best golf courses. Currently ranked as the number 2 course in Australia and the 27th best course in the world, Kingston Heath enjoys an enviable reputation for its superb conditioning all year round.

The 18 holes were built on only 125 hectares (most courses in the modern era are built on over 250 hectares), it is perfectly manicured and its bunkering and clever use of dips and hollows visually fools the non observant golfer.

Many people would argue it is a more aesthetically pleasing course than the nearby Royal Melbourne, however if you wildly deviate from the fairway, the rough (comprising long grass, tea tree and sandy scrapes) will test your ability to get the ball back into play.

The 14th hole is a longish par 5 which, depending on the wind direction, can tempt the golfer into reaching the green for 2. One golfer Roger Mackay did better than that in a tournament at the Heath when he holed his second shot for an albatross.

The three par 3 holes are a feature of Kingston Heath and show off one fantastic feature of this great golf course - the classic, natural bunkering. The fifteenth hole, in particular, is a real test ( not necessarily needed towards the end of your round).

An uphill par 3 of moderate length, the path to the hole is surrounded by a myriad of bunkers (some of them very deep) all waiting to swallow the errant tee shot. If you reach the putting surface par is still not guaranteed as the undulating green gives up more 3 putts than 1 putts.

The remaining finishing holes are long par 4's and can ruin an otherwise good score. The 16th is known in golfing circles as the hole where Greg Norman took a 9 on his way to losing a tournament at Kingston Heath in the 1990's. Norman carved his tee shot into the right hand tea tree and it was all downhill from there.

Kingston Heath has hosted the Australian Open 8 times (7 men’s & 1 women’s) as well as hosting the 2009 Australian Masters. This event saw world number 1 golfer Tiger Woods grace the fairways of KH, and he didn’t disappoint, displaying superb shot-making over 4 rounds to take out the yellow jacket.

Kingston Heath is a wonderful golf course and a true delight to play. If you can manage to play a round there it is worth the effort - you will not be disappointed.

Course Information

Par: 72
ACR: 74
Length (m): 6352
Architect: Dan Soutar (bunkering by Alister Mackenzie)
Design Year: 1925
Top 100: 2

Playing Tips

1
Par 4, Length 418m

A long, accurate drive is required on this straight par four. Heavy rough and fairway bunkers make the first shot most demanding. An excellent starting hole.

2
Par 4, Length 351m

A well placed tee shot will leave only a short, uninterrupted pitch to the green. However, heavy timber on the left could spell trouble for any wayward shots or shortcut attempts. Accuracy, not distance, is the key.

3
Par 4, Length 269m

This is the shortest par four on the course. Most players will be looking for birdies here, but the terraced green is very undulating and could turn a potential one-putt into three.

4
Par 4, Length 357m

The fairway is wide open, but a drive to the left affords the best approach to the heavily bunkered green. Once again, the green has many undulations and slopes from back to front.

5
Par 3, Length 173m

Although this is the longest par three on the course, it is a fairly straightforward hole. There are plenty of sand traps on both sides, but the size of the green provides reasonable margin for error off the tee.

6
Par 4, Length 393m

A difficult par four requiring a long drive and a long second shot. A string of bunkers waits to snare any approach straying right, although the area around the green itself is fairly clear.

7
Par 5, Length 460m

The par five seventh hole is a definite birdie or eagle chance. Drive down the left centre of the fairway, short of the cross bunker. I favour a fairway wood or long iron to pass the small swale at the entrance of the green. Any shot short of the swale is very difficult to judge.

8
Par 4, Length 398m

Another long par four requiring placement off the tee. The drive must be kept left to open up the green and avoid fairway traps and rough on the corner of the dogleg. The green is severely bunkered on the left.

9
Par 4, Length 328m

A relief, but accuracy is essential. Many will use an iron from the tee. The green slopes from left to right and is virtually surrounded by bunkers and thick bush.

10
Par 3, Length 128m

There should be plenty of birdies on this short hole, but any misdirected shots will finish in either heavy rough or one of the numerous bunkers, which surround the green.

11
Par 4, Length 378m

This hole has many pitfalls. Fairway bunkers just over 200 metres from the tee, heavy timber on either side, and an out of bounds behind the narrow green. There will be more bogeys than birdies on this tough hole.

12
Par 5, Length 509m

A solid par 5, and a real birdie chance with three well executed shots. However, the players, who take the shortest line along the left, must contend with fairway traps, thick timber, and an out of bounds.

13
Par 4, Length 323m

Another potential birdie opportunity, but again the tee shot should be well placed. Any shot hit to the right will leave a more difficult approach over bunkers to the small green.

14
Par 5, Length 515m

The longest hole, where birdies will be scarce. Bunkers 45 metres short of the green leave little opening for long hitters attempt to get close in two. An out of bounds left and behind the green provides an additional mental hazard.

15
Par 3, Length 141m

This hole is considered by many to be one of the best par three's in Australia. The very narrow green is protected by deep bunkers on both sides and slopes sharply from back to front.

16
Par 4, Length 397m

The first of a trio of great finishing par four's. This hole doglegs right with a large number of bunkers perfectly placed to deter or challenge long hitters. The extremely fast, sloping green requires a delicate putting touch.

17
Par 4, Length 420m

An extremely difficult par four, particularly if the wind is blowing from the north. Any shot hooked to the left is 'dead', and the huge, sloping putting surface will produce many three-putts.

18
Par 4, Length 391m

An accurate long iron approach is required to set up a par on this hole. The green is guarded by traps on both sides and like the previous 17, has many rolls and borrows.

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The Metropolitan Golf Club

Golf Road
Oakleigh South, VIC, 3167
Australia

Region: Melbourne Sandbelt

The Metropolitan Golf Club

The Metropolitan Golf Club is one of Australia's premier golf courses. Tucked quietly in Melbourne's south eastern suburbs it is one of the renowned "sandbelt courses" and widely recognised as one of the finest golf courses in Australia. It has also been described as the Australian equivalent of Augusta National. The perfect fairways, marbletop greens and blindingly white bunkers all combine to offer a test of golf not seen previously in Australia. Metropolitan is a tough but fair test of golf.

The Metropolitan Golf Club is one of Australia's premier golf courses. Tucked quietly in Melbourne's south eastern suburbs it is one of the renowned "sandbelt courses" and widely recognised as one of the finest golf courses in Australia.

The course has continually challenged the best players in the world. Peter Thomson began his brilliant career with a win here in the 1951 Australian Open. Jack Newton won the Australian Open in 1979 by one shot from a young Greg Norman, who three putted the final green.

In 1993 Brad Faxon mastered Metropolitan with a four round score of 275, 13 under par, including equaling Greg Norman's course record 65.

In 1997 Lee Westwood won a very exciting Australian Open defeating Greg Norman in a sudden death playoff on the 18th hole.

In 2001 the course hosted the World Matchplay Championships-a tournament which saw the world's top golfers gather at Metropolitan for a unique matchplay event where the unlikely winner Steve Stricker walked away with a cool $1 million pay cheque.

Most recently the course hosted the 2009 Women’s Australian Open with former world number one Laura Davies prevailing in a very exciting finish.

Metropolitan Golf Club can also be described as the Australian equivalent of Augusta National. The perfect fairways, marbletop greens and blindingly white bunkers all combine to offer a test of golf not seen previously in Australia. Metropolitan is a tough but fair test of golf.

Course Information

Par: 72
ACR: 74
Length (m): 6427
Architect: J.B. Mackenzie (1906), Dick Wilson (1959)
Design Year: 1906
Top 100: 13

Playing Tips

1
Par 4, Length 372m

The tee shot should be played right of the fairway bunker on the left. The second shot to an open green requires a long iron or fairway wood.

2
Par 3, Length 143m

One of the most picturesque holes on the course. The hole is heavily bunkered and the green moderately contoured. Anything not landing on the green will bring about a tough second shot.

3
Par 4, Length 368m

A two-tiered green sloping from left to right requires a tee shot to be played into the right hand side of the fairway. Such positioning opens up the second shot to the green. However, the greenside bunkers on the left is one to stay away from.

4
Par 5, Length 444m

A fairway bunker jutting out from the right side of the fairway requires a tee shot down the left. The second shot should be played short of the bunkers, allowing a pitch to a slightly elevated green. This hole favours the long hitters.

5
Par 4, Length 340m

Another hole made more difficult by the addition of a new championship tee. Two deep fairway bunkers are right in play down the left side of the driving area, the right hand fairway bunker is of little concern. The green features a huge slope off the shoulder of the right hand greenside bunker and if the flag is in the right half of the green an approach from the left half of the fairway - usually with a short or mid iron - is ideal. Widely regarded as one of the classic holes on the course.

6
Par 5, Length 457m

The 6th is the second of three front nine par fives and the player must drive to the far left side of the dogleg if an approach over the huge gum trees that block both the shot and view down to the green is to be avoided. Jack Nicklaus, famously, carried the fairway bunker that stretches across the left half of the fairway (270 metres) with a driver and a small ball in the 1967 Australian P.G.A Championship. The green and surrounds have been redesigned, the new cavernous bunkers and heavily contoured green require skilled shotmaking whether from a long second or short third shot.

7
Par 3, Length 180m

The longest par three on the course is characterized by a generous green sloping from the top right to the bottom left from the tee. A long iron or wood is required.

8
Par 5, Length 460m

A big fairway bunker has to be negotiated with the drive. The second shot should be placed on the right side of the fairway, which makes the approach considerably easier as the green slopes from left to right.

9
Par 4, Length 386m

A perfect hole to drag out that tired old story of "when I was your age I could drive it across those trees". In 1968 Nicklaus flew it over the corner trees on this sharp dogleg right with a three wood and hit a wedge to the green for four straight days but "the trees were only so high when I was your age". They have grown up so tall now it's impossible to pull that shot off. Most play down to the corner with a long iron or a three wood and if the driver comes out it has to be perfectly faded around the corner or it runs through the fairway. The second shot can vary between a four iron down to an eight or nine. This is the most beautifully contoured and shaped green on the golf course - being on in two is no guarantee of a par.

10
Par 4, Length 396m

A long dogleg left plays all of its length. The hole requires two good shots to reach the large green in two.

11
Par 3, Length 140m

A testing par three. The green slopes diagonally as you look at it from the tee-box. The tee shot should be directed towards the left part of the green. Play conservatively.

12
Par 4, Length 351m

Off the tee, the ideal position is the centre right part of the fairway to avoid sand traps on the left. The second shot should be played to the right side of the green, taking the front bunkers out of play.

13
Par 3, Length 131m

Playing to a large, well bunkered green, a shot to the middle of the putting surface is desirable. if you miss the green, be prepared for a tough up and down.

14
Par 5, Length 495m

A dogleg left as well as fairway bunkers on that side demand a shot to the right of the fairway off the tee. From there the second shot should be played to within pitching distance of the green with a chance for birdie. This hole favours the long hitters.

15
Par 4, Length 410m

This is probably the most difficult of Metropolitan's par fours and again the strategy is simple and clear. A long bunker with a high lip sits into the left side of the fairway and a green that angles from its front left corner to the back right clearly favours an approach from close to the fairway bunker. A greenside bunker closes off the flag for those approaching from the right and only a big high fade will get the job done for those who fly their drives too far to the right.

16
Par 4, Length 314m

This short par four doglegs sharply right around several deep fairway bunkers that have proved pivotal in deciding at least two Australian Opens. Bob Shearer in 1979 and Ian Baker-Finch in 1986 both drove into the bunkers and made killer bogeys that cost them their chance in those tournaments. Some can drive far enough to reach the green but it's almost impossible to keep such a long shot on the small sloping green. Often the pin placement dictates the best place to play to from the tee with the most difficult pin to get close to being behind the front right bunker, when the flag is there it's often easier to approach from 70 metres than it is from 30. A wonderful example of how great a well designed short par four can be.

17
Par 4, Length 374m

A single deep bunker that is almost impossible to hit the green from, sits in the left side of the driving area. It's the one place not to go. Some curiously sited trees (but favorites of the members) 60 metres short of the green make for a blind second for those who have driven to the right, although that is the only effect they have in the play of the hole. The green is relatively large, not in truth that difficult to hit and only when the pin is tucked close to the bunkers do they have much influence on the approach.

18
Par 4, Length 383m

The championship tee added for the 1997 Australian Open stretched this hole out to 433 metres and into a wind from the north it's a brutally difficult hole. The hole is actually dead straight and it is the blocked drive that is caught by the fairway bunkers down the right, but when the flag is on the left of the green it's clearly best to approach from close to the bunkers. In the 1979 Australian Open, Greg Norman hit two terrific shots, the second with a five iron, just under the tier of the two level green and then three putted to lose by one to Jack Newton. Eighteen years later in 1997, from almost exactly the same spot, Norman three putted in the playoff with Lee Westwood to lose the Open again.

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The Royal Melbourne GC (East Course)

Cheltenham Road
Black Rock, VIC, 3193
Australia

Region: Melbourne Sandbelt

The Royal Melbourne GC (East Course)

The East Course at Royal Melbourne spreads itself over 3 different paddocks and as a result contains a series of holes which are different to its more famous cousin - the West Course. The generally flatter land still provides a selection of contrasting holes which fit together to form an enjoyable 18 hole selection.

Royal Melbourne Golf Club is continually rated as the number 1 golf course in Australia and has been as high as number 5 in the world. The golf club boasts 36 holes comprising of the East and West courses.

The 18 hole composite course comprises 6 holes from the East Course and 12 holes from the West Course all contained within the one boundary. The East Course crosses the road on 2 separate occasions and the "paddocks" across the road from the main part of the course are generally less hilly.

The style of holes are similar-the gaping bunkers, lightning fast greens, combination of short and long par 4 holes however the tree species features a number of eucalyptus trees which give the course a sort of country flavour in addition to the more populous tea tree which flanks most fairways.

There are a number of key features of Royal Melbourne - tea tree scrub lining the fairways and catching any errant shots, cavernous bunkers surrounding most greens and also placed strategically on most fairways to catch a slightly wayward drive and lightning fast greens that give up their fair share of 3 putts.

Both courses at Royal Melbourne consists of the full gamut of golf holes - strategic short par 4 holes measuring less than 300 metres (similar to another MacKenzie masterpiece - Cypress Point), classic par 3 holes with undulating putting surfaces, surrounding bunkers and local wind and reachable par 5 holes which reward precise shotmaking.

.

Course Information

Par: 72
ACR: 72
Length (m): 6030
Architect: Alex Russell
Design Year: 1932
Top 100: 8

Playing Tips

1
Par 4, Length 304m

A deceptive hole, short with a big fairway trap, but a real birdie chance. Players need to drive left or centre, with a fairway trap guarding the right side and a steep hill running into deep rough for tee shots hooked too far left. The small fast-sloping green is stepped and guarded by deep bunkers at the entrance.

2
Par 4, Length 402m

A long-driving hole with a different approach. Accuracy is required off the tee to navigate the dog leg and then a deceptive hill up to the hole often leaves players short. The green is guarded by bunkers along the right fairway and on the left of the green.

3
Par 4, Length 350m

A deceptive hole; short for a par four, but an accurate iron is recommended off the tee as the target area is small. The green is guarded on both sides by sand traps, but a good eight iron can set up a birdie chance. A trough from the centre of the green running right can be a problem.

4
Par 3, Length 184m

Par threes often present a little relief from long driving, but not this one. A wood is often used off the tee, firing up to an elevated green, where it's hard to judge the distance. A straight shot can avoid a couple of huge bunkers, especially on the left.

5
Par 4, Length 317m

The 5th Hole is a short Par 4. After a blind drive you require a lofted, well judged short shot to a green that slopes downward to the back of the green.

6
Par 3, Length 160m

The 6th Hole is a tricky Par 3 surrounded by bunkers that require precise club selection. The green has many deceptive slopes.

7
Par 5, Length 475m

The 7th Hole is a long Par 5 with bunkers along the right hand side. This green can be reached in two, given the right conditions.

8
Par 4, Length 396m

This is a long par 4 and the main danger with this hole is to miss the green on the right hand side.

9
Par 4, Length 350m

The 9th Hole is a demanding short Par 4. The drive is tight and the second shot, with approximately an 8 iron, is to a very narrow green, surrounded by difficult bunkers.

10
Par 5, Length 457m

A good driving hole where there is room in the left for the average golfer from where he can lay up short of the fairway bunkers. The low marker may wish to carry the drive bunkers to set up a long second shot at the two tierd green. Such a drive must beware the out of bounds on the right. Leave all approaches under the hole to leave an uphill putt.

11
Par 4, Length 329m

The 11th Hole is a short dog-leg Par 4, wide open driving hole to a very narrow sloping green.

12
Par 4, Length 412m

The 12th Hole is a long Par 4 which sometimes requires two woods. The second shot needs to be accurate.

13
Par 3, Length 135m

The 13th Hole is a beautiful short Par 3 with a sloping green. Well bunkered and requires good club selection.

14
Par 4, Length 393m

The 14th Hole is a demanding dog-leg Par 4 that requires a precise long iron second shot to an elevated green.

15
Par 4, Length 277m

This short Par 4 can be birdied with a well judged lofted second shot. The green has a slope throughout the middle making it a true Par 4.

16
Par 3, Length 151m

The 16th Hole is a long difficult Par 3, well bunkered with a ridge running through the middle of the green.

17
Par 5, Length 520m

One for the attacking golfers, with the barrier of fairway bunkers forcing the decision to go long twice or lay up short and approach with a sand iron. It's an open driving hole, but accuracy is needed, with all the emphasis on the choice of the second shot, with those traps neatly placed to catch the wrong decision-makers.

18
Par 4, Length 395m

A great way to finish, with a long hole, but offering the accurate hitters a birdie chance to sign off with. The long drivers still need a big second shot, but the green is large and inviting once you pass over the fairway bunkers. The green is surrounded by traps with some rough in front and the entry is nice and narrow.

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The Royal Melbourne GC (West Course)

Cheltenham Road
Black Rock, VIC, 3193
Australia

Region: Melbourne Sandbelt

The Royal Melbourne GC (West Course)

The Royal Melbourne Golf Club is a 36 hole private members club located in the heart of the world famous Melbourne Sandbelt golf region. The West Course is regularly rated as the number one rated golf course in Australia (and was recently ranked number 6 in the world) and was designed by world renowned golf course architect Dr Alistair MacKenzie. The natural peaks and troughs in the terrain have been used to maximum benefit with strategically designed and memorable holes throughout.

The Royal Melbourne Golf Club is continually rated as the number 1 golf course in Australia and has been as high as number 5 in the world. It is the most recognised golf course on the world famous Melbourne Sandbelt.

There are a number of key features of Royal Melbourne - tea tree scrub lining the fairways and catching any errant shots, cavernous bunkers surrounding most greens and also placed strategically on most fairways to catch a slightly wayward drive and lightning fast greens that give up their fair share of 3 putts.The golf club boasts 36 holes comprising of the East and West courses. The 18 hole composite course comprises 6 holes from the East Course and 12 holes from the West Course all contained within the one boundary.

The West Course forms the majority of holes contained within the main boundaries of the golf course aside from 4 holes (13 to 16) which are played across the road in an adjoining property. The par 5 holes are not long and all are reachable in two for the longer hitters. The difficulty of these holes is not so much in the length of the holes but rather the harsh penalties which exists for a less than perfectly struck shot.

The style of the holes is similar and MacKenzie has used the peaks and troughs in the slope of the land to maximum benefit. The course is not hilly by any stretch of the imagination however additional challenges are created on selected uphill approach shots. Both courses at Royal Melbourne consists of the full gamut of golf holes - strategic short par 4 holes measuring less than 300 metres (similar to another MacKenzie masterpiece - Cypress Point), classic par 3 holes with undulating putting surfaces, surrounding bunkers and local wind and reachable par 5 holes which reward precise shotmaking.

Course Information

Par: 72
ACR: 72
Length (m): 6030
Architect: Alister MacKenzie
Design Year: 1931
Top 100: 1

Playing Tips

1
Par 4, Length 392m

A good open driving hole, this presents a wide area leading up to a big green with little danger. But it's a deceptive hole, with a hooked tee shot leading to danger in unplayable trees on the left. A deep trap on the right of the green, plus a grassy mound and deep rough on the left, makes it a little deceptive. A hard par four and not a lot of birdies.

2
Par 5, Length 439m

A fast sloping green stands between a par and a possible eagle as this hole can be reached in two. There's plenty of room for the drive and a long iron can put big hitters on the green if they carry the bunkers guarding the entrance to the hole. Hitting too far left will find some thick ti-tree or maybe heavy rough - or the deep bunker.

3
Par 4, Length 324m

This is a real birdie chance, with a good drive able to set up a comfortable approach pitch. But beware - the green slopes down over the back and it's easy to finish well past the pin. Bunkers on the left are dangerous, but it's an open approach.

4
Par 5, Length 430m

A tough hole that is a good par if achieved. The drive goes over a hill, with fairway bunkers looming for the short shot. A wood or long iron approach must be straight, as bunkers on either side of the green are trouble.

5
Par 3, Length 161m

Accuracy and the right choice of club makes this a superb par three hole. A middle iron is needed to cross a valley to the green, heavily fortified with bunkers. The fast green has a steep slope from front to back and is a tricky test.

6
Par 4, Length 391m

Rated as the most difficult green on the course, the early shots are crucial. A sharp dog leg makes it vital that the tee shot carries a minimum of 200-metres across dense rough and fairway traps, in order to leave the ball in the right position. The elevated green slopes towards the front and produces many three putts.

7
Par 3, Length 135m

A deceptively easy-looking hole where club selection is vital. The tee shot must be well-placed, with the narrow green and difficult undulations making long putts tough. It goes uphill from the tee, with plenty of bunkers, especially for those who over-shoot the green.

8
Par 4, Length 346m

The 8th Hole is a deceptive Par 4 that requires a well judged second shot, to a flat green, that slopes towards the back bunkers.

9
Par 4, Length 380m

The 9th Hole is a testing Par 4, uphill to the green, well bunkered on both sides.

10
Par 4, Length 279m

A tempting hole for the big hitters, especially if they attack the pin by cutting the corner. But that's where the danger is, as the sand bunker is huge and a miss can be penalised. It's short, but suits the disciplined players who go the right way around. But watch the long drivers tackle that corner!

11
Par 4, Length 416m

A deceptive hole that tempts the big hitters who challenge the fairway trap and rough on the left as they go direct. A second shot to a sloping green is a long haul and must be accurate, with bunkers guarding the entrance. A drive and a four iron can still produce many bogies.

12
Par 5, Length 435m

A lengthy fairway which requires a couple of long shots, especially off the tee where some early bunkers await the strong hitters. This modified par four becomes difficult into the northerly wind.

13
Par 3, Length 134m

The 13th Hole is a challenging short Par 3, with a pitched green making it difficult to get close to the pin.

14
Par 4, Length 335m

The 14th Hole is a very good Par 4 with the green sloping right to left, making it hard to get close to the pin.

15
Par 5, Length 427m

The 15th Hole is a short but tricky Par 5 which can be reached with an iron. The green slopes sharply to the front.

16
Par 3, Length 202m

An extremely tough Par 3 noted for its extensive bunkers and small green. Woods are often required from the tee, however don't overplay, lay up short to find an easier approach.

17
Par 4, Length 401m

Again two long shots are required, with the drive passing some bunkers on the left-hand side of the fairway. It's a tight driving hole and the second shot to a modified green needs a mid to short iron depending on the wind. Dangerous traps on the right make for a straight approach.

18
Par 4, Length 396m

This is a pleasant-looking hole, but full of danger. A dog-leg to the right means the drive must carry upwards and over 200-metres to present an approach shot from a downhill lie. The green looks awesome, well-protected by bunkers, but a good eight iron lobbed nicely will pay dividends.

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Victoria Golf Club

Park Road
Cheltenham, VIC, 3192
Australia

Region: Melbourne Sandbelt

Victoria Golf Club

Victoria Golf Club is, in many ways, similar to its neighbour Royal Melbourne. Its layout challenges players of all standards - deep bunkers catch errant shots both at the greenside and off the tee and the greens can be lightning fast. Victoria has hosted a number of major tournaments including the 2010-2011 Masters, 2002 Australian Open, multiple Victorian Opens and other National tournaments.

Victoria Golf Club is, in many ways, similar to its neighbour Royal Melbourne. Thick tea tree lines most fairways, deep bunkers catch errant shots both at the greenside and off the tee and the greens can be lightning fast.

Victoria has hosted a number of major tournaments including the 2010-2011 Masters, 2002 Australian Open, multiple Victorian Opens and other National tournaments.

The course has a number of interesting features, namely two driveable par 4s (1st and 15th), back to back par 5s (8th and 9th and 17th and 18th) and in the middle some strong par 4 holes.

The short first hole, creates a birdie expectation from your first tee shot and this can often put more pressure on the golfer than if this hole came midway through the round. A short hole does not automatically guarantee a good score and whilst there are plenty of birdies on this hole there are also a fair share of bogies.

The 17th and 18th holes provide a chance to claw back lost shots during the round but only if the wind is blowing in a favourable direction. The 18th, in particular, is reachable in two and the large, flat putting surfaces gives up a large number of birdies and even eagles.

Course Information

Par: 72
ACR: 73
Length (m): 6219
Architect: Oscar Damman and William Meader
Design Year: 1927
Top 100: 11

Playing Tips

1
Par 4, Length 233m

A well-hit tee shot could skip between bunkers and roll to a stop very close to the flagstick. Any tee shot landing short will either bounce into sand or require a deft high pitch to an undulating putting surface.

2
Par 4, Length 392m

Aiming left of the 3 fairway bunkers makes sense on this hole; however, long tee shots often run through the fairway into trouble. When the tee markers are forward a three wood is a good selection.

3
Par 4, Length 401m

A difficult par four, with bunkers on the both sides of the fairway which will snare any shot that strays from the tees. About 160 metres from the back of the right fairway bunker to a green with a narrow opening.

4
Par 3, Length 164m

A tightly bunkered one-shotter to a heavily sloping green, protected by gaping bunkers. Most balls finish short on this hole in the front bunker.

5
Par 4, Length 398m

Playing this hole at its full length means the fairway bunker is out of reach for most players. A left to right second shot is the best option if the green is within range.

6
Par 4, Length 398m

A difficult par four which needs a long and straight tee shot to avoid thick trees on the right and sand on the left. From the start of the first bunker on the left there are about 190 metres to the centre of a heavily trapped green.

7
Par 3, Length 165m

A challenging par three. Usually a shot hit to the left of the green will bounce and swing to the centre of the putting surface. A deep bunker guards the right-hand side of the green.

8
Par 5, Length 448m

Long hitters find a very narrow landing area on the 8th, however the temptation is always there as the green is reachable in two shots.

9
Par 5, Length 559m

Players capable of carrying the hill with their second shots enjoy a huge advantage on this hole. For many players four shots are needed. Fairway bunkers are severe on both sides.

10
Par 4, Length 348m

Bend your tee shot to the left on this par four to avoid deep bunkers at the corner of this slight dog-leg. From here the second shot is about 125 metres from a bushy tree at the right of the fairway to an elevated and well bunkered green.

11
Par 4, Length 370m

A difficult two-shotter, through an avenue of trees slightly to the right, with lots of trouble along that side of the fairway. The second shot is slightly uphill to a heavily trapped and tricky green.

12
Par 4, Length 390m

At its full length this hole is best played as a par 5 by most golfers. From the forward markers in favourable conditions the fairway bunkers can be carried reducing the hole to a wedge second.

13
Par 4, Length 392m

This par four requires a tee shot hit over a crest, with a second shot from a downhill lie. The bunker at the right of the fairway is some 185 metres to a ridge on the green.

14
Par 3, Length 142m

This par three is the easiest hole on the course (in theory) and should bring some breathing space. However, it requires difficult uphill play to a heavily trapped green that contains many vicious rolls. A difficult short hole.

15
Par 4, Length 289m

A very short par four that can be reached in one with a tee shot aimed right of centre. The ball will kick left from there towards the green. There are trees on the right and a stray shot will also be snared by bunkers along the left.

16
Par 3, Length 178m

A par three which is usually affected by the wind. The conditions will determine a long iron or a wood which must be struck uphill boldly to avoid trouble all around the green.

17
Par 5, Length 550m

A dog-leg par five which curves to the right and requires three good hits to a very fast putting surface with a tricky borrow. Avoid the fairway bunkers on both sides, the closest of which is some 140 metres to the left-hand side of the green.

18
Par 5, Length 461m

This par five offers the golfer the chance to finish with a birdie four. However, strategically placed bunkers catch many tee and second shots. The green falls sharply from right to left and may require several putts.

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Call us on +61 3 9563 6776

We look forward to hearing from you and helping you experience the best golf in the world.

Matthew Ridge, Golf Travel Manager, GOLFSelect

Matthew Ridge Golf Travel Manager

Richard Morgan, Golf Travel Specialist, GOLFSelect

Richard Morgan Golf Travel Specialist

Linda Falconer, Golf Travel Specialist

Linda Falconer Golf Travel Specialist

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GOLFSelect is strongly committed to assisting children who are not as fortunate as our own. We enjoy a very strong association with Door of Hope Australia Inc. This child-focused, non government organisation was established to help alleviate the suffering caused by poverty in developing nations. Their vision is that children in every nation will have access to education, clean water, nutrition, medical care, and protection from war, abuse and exploitation. As part of our association, a donation is provided to Door of Hope for every holiday that we organise on behalf of you, our client. We thank you for supporting this initiative and helping to make an important difference to those who do not always have a voice.