Courses

Anglesea Golf Club

Noble Street
Anglesea, VIC, 3230
Australia

Region: Bellarine Peninsula, Surfcoast & Shipwreck Coast

Anglesea Golf Club

The Anglesea course is an undulating 6028m Par 73 layout. A feature of the course is the number of elevated greens that require plenty of thought when selecting your club. There are only 42 bunkers throughout the course which have been likened to the famed sandbelt bunkers, and coupled with the eucalypt tree lined fairways combine to produce a stimulating round. Also there is the ever present resident population of Eastern Grey Kangaroos which number approximately 300 to provide a pleasant distraction.

The Anglesea course is an undulating 6028m Par 73 layout. A feature of the course is the number of elevated greens that require plenty of thought when selecting your club. There are only 42 bunkers throughout the course which have been likened to the famed sandbelt bunkers, and coupled with the eucalypt tree lined fairways combine to produce a stimulating round.

Also there is the ever present resident population of Eastern Grey Kangaroos which number approximately 300 to provide a pleasant distraction.

Course Information

Par: 73
ACR: 72
Length (m): 6028
Architect: Vern Morcom
Design Year: 1953

Playing Tips

1
Par 5, Length 434m

The 1st hole is 434m in length and has a slightly uphill gentle dogleg left. The longer hitter can reach this hole, but care needs to be taken on the semi-blind 2nd shot to avoid the 3 greenside bunkers. A green that slopes gently from back to front awaits your opening putt.

2
Par 5, Length 528m

The 2nd is a 528m par 5 that plays from an elevated tee down into a gully and back up to an elevated sloping green. Only the longest hitters can reach this green with 2 very well struck shots. The tee shot ideally should be hit down the right hand side of the fairway with a slight draw to gain maximum distance using the slope of the hole. The deep bunker on the right hand side of the green is to be avoided.

3
Par 3, Length 159m

After a short steep walk, the 3rd is a wonderful par 3 of 159m from the elevated championship tee. A well-struck shot is required to safely reach the smallest green on the course which is well bunkered. Once on the green, putting is relatively easy on a flat surface.

4
Par 4, Length 372m

An elevated tee shot awaits on the 4th hole, a dogleg left of 372m. A drive pulled to the left is better than a sliced drive as balls feed back to the fairway from the left. A short iron is all that is required for the 2nd shot to a green well guarded by 4 bunkers. Par is a good score if you find any of the bunkers, and beware of going through the green as there are rarely 4s made from there.

5
Par 4, Length 340m

Two well-struck shots are needed to reach the small green of the 340m par 4 dogleg right 5th hole. A drive into a narrow landing area protected by a right hand side fairway bunker at 220m from the tee is needed. A 3 wood or long iron tee shot can be used to lay up into the widest part of the fairway. From here a mid to short iron to an elevated green will be needed. If in doubt take the longer club as anything short will head back down the fairway and balls will feed back down to the centre of the green from the right if they have been hit the correct distance. Upon reaching the green beware if you have any sort of downhill putt, as they are much faster than what you may think. Take par here and go happily to the 6th.

6
Par 3, Length 176m

The 2nd of the par 3s, the 6th hole is slightly uphill, 176m in length. A narrow opening between the front bunkers allows you to run the ball on to the green if you are good enough. A large sloping green makes putting a difficult task. Many scorecards have been ruined at the sixth hole.

7
Par 4, Length 302m

The 7th hole is a bit of a sleeper and as many bogies as birdies are made here. As you stand on the tee you face what appears to be a wide driving area. At 302m it is a short dogleg right par 4, but it does require an accurate tee shot. The drive needs to be placed in the left half of the fairway to get the best line for the 2nd shot. The longer hitters can reach the fairway bunker on the right side, so a 3 wood or long iron may be a wise choice from the tee. A short iron is all that is needed for the 2nd shot which is uphill to the well-bunkered green. Best to be short of the pin here as putting downhill will cause problems.

8
Par 5, Length 451m

A definite birdie hole is the 8th. A short par 5 of 451m which doglegs left at around the 200m mark, you are faced with the choice of driving straight down the fairway, or if you are a longer hitter, driving over as much of the treeline as you think you can. There is a sandy wasteland guarding the right hand side of the hole and a fairway bunker 220m from the tee also on the right side, both of which are visible from the tee. As you turn the corner at the dogleg you are greeted by a wonderful view of the shot to the green. Played through the gully the green sits atop of the rise and is guarded by 4 menacing bunkers. The green can be easily reached by a lot of players with their 2nd shots, but beware as only a well hit shot with some spin on it will hold the green.

9
Par 4, Length 335m

Another dogleg left waits as you complete the front nine. The 9th is a 335m par 4 with a tee shot somewhat similar to the 8th in as much as you can cut the corner over the trees by as much as you like. A drawing drive is an advantage. If you have hit your tee shot far enough you will be able to see the base of the green which makes distance judgment much easier. If not you will still be able to see the pin. A mid to short iron will be needed to reach the green which is guarded by 3 bunkers, which depending on pin positions can make par difficult to obtain. Once again a deceptively sloping green puts a premium on your putting stroke. If you are near your handicap after the front nine you have usually set yourself for a good score as the 2nd nine produces some good scoring opportunities. After completing the front nine stop in at the spike bar or pro-shop for some sustenance for the more open 2nd nine. You will need it as you go from the lowest spot on the course to the highest in just two holes.

10
Par 4, Length 292m

The 10th is a short par 4 slightly doglegging left hole of 292m. Played from a well-elevated tee, the green can be reached with the tee shot if the correct line is chosen. If not the gums along the left hand side will be the result if the drive is not long enough. The safer shot is to lay up with a 3 wood or long iron some 50m short of the green. From here it is a straightforward pitch to a flat green. A definite birdie hole!

11
Par 4, Length 334m

From the lowest point on the course the tee shot on the 11th is one of the easiest on the course. The hole is a straight uphill 334m par 4 that plays longer than its distance. You can really let rip with the tee shot to a wide-open fairway. From here a mid to short iron will be needed to reach the green. Make sure you have enough club, as anything short will come back down the hill at the front of the elevated green. The bunker at the front left of the green also needs to be avoided. Putting from past the pin is a good test of your stroke.

12
Par 5, Length 475m

The 12th is a long uphill dogleg left par 5 of 475m. The fairway slopes from left to right so keeping to the left side is an advantage. Beware of going too far left, as there is out-of-bounds the length of the hole on this side. Once again only the longest hitters can reach the green in two. Usually the third shot is played across or from within the valley 100m short of the green. Some precision is required as the shot is played to an elevated green that is only some 15m deep, slopes from back to front, and is guarded by a deep bunker at the front. Putting is also a test on this green. There are not too many birdies on this hole so par here is a good score.

13
Par 3, Length 128m

After reaching the highest point on the course, take a few deep breaths before playing the easiest hole on the course. The 13th is a 128m downhill par 3 to a smallish green that is bunkered on both sides. Only a high well-struck tee shot will hold one of the firmest greens on the course that also slopes away from you. Anything over the green usually makes par difficult.

14
Par 4, Length 408m

The 14th is a slightly downhill par 4 of 408m. This hole bends gently from left to right and has a fairway that slopes from right to left. Another wide-open fairway waits, and a good line off the tee is the chimneystack of the nearby power station with a slight draw to gain maximum length. A premium is put on the second shot here to a two-tiered green that when the pin is on the upper level is difficult to get close to. The green has a deep bunker on the left hand side and some mounds and swales on the right. Any shot missing this green and you are faced with a difficult task to make your par.

15
Par 4, Length 348m

A nice short downhill dogleg left par 4 of 348m, the 15th yields plenty of birdies. There are no bunkers on this hole to worry about. The tee shot is played over a small wetland 50m from the tees that surprisingly collect plenty of balls. The longer hitters can take on as much of the dogleg as they can to considerably shorten the hole, over the pine tree is the line. The hole doglegs at around the 200m mark from the tee and most players can reach the corner. From here it is a short iron that can be run on to a flat green. Try to avoid missing the green long or right, as chipping is quite difficult from these areas.

16
Par 3, Length 125m

The final par 3, the 16th is a picturesque hole of 125m that is best played from the upper left tee to fully appreciate the hole. Played across a valley to an elevated and very small green a well judged shot is required. Anything landing on the front of, or short of the green will roll well back down the hill. There is a very deep bunker on the left of the green from where 3 is very rarely made. The bunker on the right is not much better and avoid being long at all costs. Once on the green, putting is not difficult, but beware of the speed putting from the back of the green.

17
Par 4, Length 366m

Rated the hardest hole on the course the 17th is an uphill par 4 of 366m, with the second shot being played once again to an elevated green. A well-stuck drive can usually leave a long to mid iron second shot. There is a large bunker short left guarding the green, that can be avoided by playing out to the right as the ball will feed towards the green from this side. Once on the green you can be faced with some severely sloping putts especially in the back half.

18
Par 5, Length 455m

Standing on the 18th tee you are looking at one of the most aesthetic finishing holes in the district. With the clubhouse forming a background you can finish your round in glory with a birdie or even possibly an eagle. The hole is 455m in length and can be reached by many players in two shots. From an elevated tee the drive is played to a wide fairway. Depending on conditions a mid iron can be used to reach the green by the longer hitters, otherwise a 3 wood or long iron will be required. The green is elevated, and guarded by a deep bunker at the front left. There is also a bunker 50m short on the right hand side. The green has four levels that make for some interesting putting. So there you have it. After sinking your birdie putt on the 18th you can head for the comforts of the clubhouse and reminisce about your round whilst having a quiet drink overlooking the 18th green. Have a bite to eat from the bistro and dont forget to watch out for the roos grazing outside the clubhouse.

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Barwon Heads Golf Club

Golf Links Road
Barwon Heads, VIC, 3227
Australia

Region: Bellarine Peninsula, Surfcoast & Shipwreck Coast

Barwon Heads Golf Club

The Barwon Heads Golf Club is located near the Bass Strait, and the sand dunes along with the weather conditions provide a course reminiscent of famed Scottish links. While not especially long the links will test golfers of all standards with cleverly positioned hazards, subtle slopes and greens, along with challenging tee positions. The wind ensures that the course rarely plays the same way twice even in the one week.

The Links at Barwon Heads regularly rates in Australia's top 30 courses. The nearby Bass Strait and sand dunes along with the weather conditions provide a links reminiscent of famed Scottish links.

The undulating terrain, in harmony with the natural features of the land will ensure that you will remember time spent at Barwon Heads.

While not especially long the Links will test golfers of all standards with cleverly positioned hazards, subtle slopes and the greens along with challenging tee positions. The wind ensures that the course rarely plays the same way twice in the one week.

The turf is maintained to the highest standard and in the summer a local species of couch grass dominates the fairways. In the cooler months the species of Poa Annua provides an excellent fairway cover.

The greens are predominantly of Poa Annua and are maintained to the highest standard. It is their practice that the greens be cut for guests every morning, so a true and fast surface is virtually assured.

Course Information

Par: 70
ACR: 70
Length (m): 5718
Architect: Victor East and Mick Morcom
Design Year: 1921
Top 100: 27

Playing Tips

1
Par 4, Length 299m

The opening hole is a friendly par four. After a good drive, the uphill pitch to an elevated green requires good judgement of distance.

2
Par 3, Length 207m

The 2nd hole is very demanding at this length. A tough par three.

3
Par 4, Length 390m

A classic links hole, the 3rd plays into the prevailing southwesterly, often calling for two wood shots. The tee shot must be placed left of the three large limestone pits. This turns the hole into a slight dogleg with an uphill second shot.

4
Par 3, Length 165m

From the high tee, the view of the rugged coastline ranges from Lorne to Cape Schanck. With the Bass Strait just short pitch away, the wind is always telling factor on this par three. The two-tiered green requires a good touch and good nerve.

5
Par 5, Length 458m

The 5th is reachalbe in two shots with the prevailing wind. This hole tempts the golfer to flex his muscles.

6
Par 4, Length 348m

Not so the 6th, where the landing area from the tee lies along a steep ridge. Any ball not struck surely off the tee will make the golfer work hard. The second shot is often uphill to a firm green.

7
Par 4, Length 368m

More difficult still is the 7th. A good drive will just carry the ball over the brow of a hill leaving a mid iron shot to a semi-blind green.

8
Par 3, Length 168m

With only 146 metres to negotiate and a reasonably generous green, this hole is the last chance for the golfer to relax for some time.

9
Par 4, Length 400m

The difficult stretch begins with the 9th. As the fairway is divided into two sections, the tee shot must be very accurate to avoid the thick ti-trees, which entirely surround this dogleg left. The second also must be straight, often with a wood into the prevailing wind.

10
Par 4, Length 322m

Your opening shot is out of a shoot of ti-trees and into an avenue of majestic cypresses. The prevailing breeze often encourages the golfer to throw caution to the wind. A 7-iron is normally required for the second shot, with enough carry to avoid trouble in front of the green.

11
Par 4, Length 346m

This hole becomes more difficult the closer you get to the green. The drive is amenable, but the approach is played to an elevated green, with four deep bunkers awaiting any shot not struck with enough courage. A par here is good golf.

12
Par 4, Length 385m

At this length into the prevailing wind, the 12th is Barwon Head's most difficult hole. With trouble down the left and bunkers and water on the right, the golfer has no choice but to hit a good drive. A long second shot finds a slippery green, here the best position is below the hole.

13
Par 3, Length 130m

This par three has been rated by golfers from around the world as equal to any in Australia, perhaps in the world. The club needed here can vary greatly, due to the exposed landscape and the perpetual wind.

14
Par 5, Length 500m

At the 14th, you head towards home. From the tee avoid some thick marsh land and bunkers on the left. The bunkers near the green are also to be avoided.

15
Par 4, Length 386m

The 15th is more difficult. After a good drive, a wood maybe needed to reach a well guarded green.

16
Par 5, Length 449m

The 16th provides the last good birdie chance. The hole needs a long drive to open up the green. If the pin is on the left side on the green, be careful of the greenside bunker.

17
Par 3, Length 159m

This hole is a friendly par three, provided you stay out of the surrounding ti-trees.

18
Par 4, Length 346m

The stately, old fashioned clubhouse overlooks the 18th. The uphill second shot always requires one more club than you would expect.

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Curlewis Golf Club

Portarlington Road
Curlewis, VIC, 3222
Australia

Region: Bellarine Peninsula, Surfcoast & Shipwreck Coast

Curlewis Golf Club

Curlewis Golf Club is located on the beautiful Bellarine Peninsula, one hour's drive from Melbourne and ten minutes from Geelong.

Curlewis Golf Club is located on the beautiful Bellarine Peninsula, one hour's drive from Melbourne and ten minutes from Geelong.

Course Information

Par: 72
ACR: 72
Length (m): 6142
Architect:
Design Year:

Playing Tips

1
Par 5, Length 448m

A tight driving hole with trees left and right. Both the tee shot and second need to be left centre of fairway otherwise you may find yourself blocked by the trees lining the right hand side. The third shot is to an elevated saddle shaped green. A pitch shot landing on the front edge may well run back off the green, finishing 30 metres away at the bottom of the slope. Thick rough guards the back of the green.

2
Par 4, Length 333m

A tee shot of about 200M down the left side will open up the green. The temptation to fire at the green from the tee can result in problems with thick right hand rough and bunkers guarding the corner and right hand front of the green. The front two thirds of the green slope back to front and right to left, the rear third falls towards the back of the green.

3
Par 4, Length 308m

A short par four with great views over Corio Bay to the YouYangs. The bombers can reach the green, however, the hole's defences include out of bounds down the left, sloping rough and trees behind the green and bunkers guarding the right. The green slopes left to right and front to back. A ball finishing in the deep left hand bunker will result in a difficult sand shot with the green falling away to the right hand bunkers and should be avoided.

4
Par 3, Length 174m

A par three rated number one on the course. 170M long but plays anything from a mid-iron through to 3-wood depending on the breeze. Distance control is a priority on this hole, the green slopes back to front with the front right hand third sloping severely to the right ? resulting in shots landing in this zone rolling off the green by some ten or fifteen metres. If the pin is on the front half of the green shots from the left hand bunkers can prove difficult with the green falling away from you.

5
Par 4, Length 341m

A straightaway hole, the fairway narrows the further you hit it, trees both sides and the ground slopes to the left from the left edge of fairway. A tee shot of about 200M to the centre of fairway will provide easy access to a gently undulating green with subtle borrows.

6
Par 5, Length 520m

The bombers can reach the green in two with drive down the right hand side, for the rest of us, a tee shot down right centre, avoiding water 210M on the right. Care is needed with the second shot with thick trees through the corner and trees and bushes lining the right hand side. The third shot is played to a green which slopes severely from back to front. A downhill putt on this green will prove difficult.

7
Par 4, Length 389m

A tee shot to the top of the hill will provide a good view of the green, bombers can drive over the hill but need to keep the drive tight to the bunker on the left hand side at the top of the hill or the result will be a second from the trees on the right. As with the sixth, try to keep the ball short of the pin on the two tiered green, bunkers through the back of the green can provide for some challenging shots.

8
Par 3, Length 139m

A mid length par 3 protected by deep bunkers with a small green. Hit the putting surface or prepare to make bogey.

9
Par 4, Length 352m

Choices from the tee are to attack the corner or positional play to the right hand edge of the corner bunkers from where the ball will roll towards centre of fairway. Should you choose to take on the corner and fail, trees and heavy rough are waiting on the left and more trees on the right hand side. Positional play will leave you with a mid to short iron to an elevated sloping green. A ball played over the right hand bunker and landing outside the right edge of green and past the pin should result in the ball finding its way close to the middle of the putting surface. The green slopes substantially from back to front with some significant borrows.

10
Par 4, Length 338m

A straightaway par four. The tee shot is over 100M of water with a string of bunkers along the left and a tongue of rough protruding from the right at about 200M. The choices from the tee are to carry the rough or play to position leaving a mid to short iron to the pin. The green is protected by a bunker on the left front and mounds and slopes on the right. The green generally slopes from back to front and right to left .

11
Par 4, Length 361m

A tee shot of 220M plus, tight to the corner, will find you in good position to attack the flag, however trees and the inside corner bunker are waiting for the shot that does not quite make it. The safest line from the tee is left centre of fairway, rough on the right is to be avoided. The back to front sloping, undulating green is protected by bunkers short left and right and rough through the back. This exposed green is often affected by the wind - there are very few easy putts here.

12
Par 5, Length 513m

The corner of this dogleg is two shots away for all but the big bombers, the best line for these two shots is left centre of fairway. The green slopes back to front with the front left falling away to the left side, a ball finishing in the middle of the green will provide a reasonable putt to most pin positions.

13
Par 3, Length 201m

A long par three guarded by strings of bunkers left and right around the green, combined with an undulating green that slopes from back to front provides a challenging golf hole.

14
Par 5, Length 484m

A tee shot left of centre will provide an easy second shot to a shortish par five, a shot down the right faces large bunkers at 200 ? 250M and tall trees on the line to the green from there. Second shot should be positioned with a view to the placement of the pin, i.e. Position on the right hand side of fairway for a left hand pin. The green is protected by left hand bunker and severe slopes throwing the ball to the right on the right front quarter of the green.

15
Par 4, Length 400m

A tee shot to the right of the inside corner bunker leaves a long shot in, however water lurks behind the tree line just short of this pot. The right to left sloping green is protected by bunkers on the right front and left hand side. Middle of the green is a good option.

16
Par 4, Length 367m

Bombers are known to take the tiger line to the green, be aware of the danger in this shot with both scrub and water down the left, a 220M tee shot centre left of the fairway provides for a short approach to an elevated green. A tee shot pushed to the right leaves a considerably longer uphill shot over the bunker protecting the front and right of the green.

17
Par 3, Length 138m

A short par three requiring a tee shot finishing on the same level as the pin on this three tiered right to left sloping green. Left will find trouble with Out of Bounds within feet of the left hand bunker. A tee shot to the right centre of the green is normally the best option. Beware the downhill putt!

18
Par 4, Length 354m

A great finishing hole which often plays much longer than its advertised meterage due to the prevailing wind. Water left and bunkers right demand a precise drive skirting the right hand pots for the long hitters, otherwise a tee shot to the right centre of fairway will provide the best approach to a green with more water on the left and bunkers front left and curling around the front and right hand side. Middle of the green is a good option.

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Lonsdale Golf Club

69 Fellows Road Point
Lonsdale, VIC, 3225
Australia

Region: Bellarine Peninsula, Surfcoast & Shipwreck Coast

Lonsdale Golf Club

Lonsdale Golf Club is a highly regarded 18-hole sandbelt course with a varied layout situated on beautiful Lake Victoria, conveniently located in Point Lonsdale on the Bellarine Peninsula. One and a half hours drive from Melbourne, the Lonsdale Golf Club course is a par 71 of 5,700 metres for men and par 72 of 5,200 metres for women.

Lonsdale Golf Club is a highly regarded 18-hole sandbelt course with a varied layout situated on beautiful Lake Victoria, conveniently located in Point Lonsdale on the Bellarine Peninsula. The nearby Rip at the opening of Port Phillip Bay to the sea, is one of the Bellarine region’s many stunning attractions along with wineries, cafes, restaurants and accommodation.

One and a half hours drive from Melbourne, the Lonsdale Golf Club course is a par 71 of 5,700 metres for men and par 72 of 5,200 metres for women.

Course Information

Par:
ACR:
Length (m):
Architect:
Design Year:

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Port Fairy Golf Club

Woodbine Road
Port Fairy, VIC, 3284
Australia

Region: Bellarine Peninsula, Surfcoast & Shipwreck Coast

Port Fairy Golf Club

Port Fairy Golf Club is a magnificent course that also doubles as one of the great coastal walks in Victoria and is just a few kilometres from one of the states most desirable seaside retreats, Port Fairy. Set in towering linksland overlooking the Southern Ocean it enjoys cult status among true golf nuts for its formidable challenge but it's difficult to get too upset about bad shots in such an awesome location.

Port Fairy Golf Club is a magnificent course that also doubles as one of the great coastal walks in Victoria and is just a few kilometres from one of the states most desirable seaside retreats, Port Fairy. Set in towering linksland overlooking the Southern Ocean it enjoys cult status among true golf nuts for its formidable challenge but it's difficult to get too upset about bad shots in such an awesome location.

The gently rolling sand dunes of Port Fairy Golf Club have been largely unaltered by man, only mown in order to define fairways and rough giving rise to a wonderful natural 'feel'. Golf at Port Fairy is typical of the great Scottish courses, such as St Andrews, Troon and Carnoustie.

Consistently ranked within the '25 Best Public Access Courses in Australia' this classic links style course winds its way through unspoilt sand dunes and provides spectacular views of the Southern Ocean. Those familiar with the golf course at Port Fairy will know that it is a precious and unique layout. Nowhere else in Victoria is golf played so close to the ocean or along dune land of such quality. A truly wonderful and unique experience will be had by golfers of all ability.

 

Course Information

Par: 72
ACR: 70
Length (m): 5840
Architect: Club members (1963), Kevin Hartley (1990)
Design Year: 1963
Top 100: 79

Playing Tips

1
Par 5, Length 463m

A good length par 5 dogleg running left to right, a well positioned drive down the right hand side will give the big hitters a chance to go for the green in two.

2
Par 4, Length 326m

Lovely undulating par 4 over the hill to an elevated, fast green; bunkers right front of green and left back.

3
Par 4, Length 304m

A short but difficult par four with lots of danger down the left and a couple of well placed bunkers guarding the green.

4
Par 3, Length 167m

A testing well bunkered par three.

5
Par 5, Length 448m

A first class par five with a beautiful undulating fairway, wide enough to make it strategically interesting. There is danger on both sides of the tee, then sweeping right uphill to a perfectly placed fast sloping green.

6
Par 4, Length 327m

Danger to the right off this tee characterised by the heavily banked dune so keep to the left. The second shot is to a relatively small green with very subtle slopes.

7
Par 4, Length 369m

Medium length par four dogleg left to an elevated green.

8
Par 3, Length 122m

Downhill par three with a devilishly fast steep green surrounded by deep bunkers. Wind strength and direction can make this hole a significantly daunting prospect.

9
Par 4, Length 355m

The most difficult hole on the front nine. This is a very good par four moving from left to right back to the Clubhouse.

10
Par 4, Length 320m

One of my favourite holes. A straight par four slopes from left to right to a back to front sloping green.

11
Par 3, Length 141m

Terrific par three with great views off to the right.

12
Par 5, Length 465m

A very simple straightforward par five the only hazard being the out-of-bounds line to the right. Views from the tee one of the most stunning in Australian golf, this hole skirts the Southern Ocean from tee to green. Superb views back to Port Fairy and the lighthouse. Note: On this hole, the 14th, 15th and 16th you may be lucky enough to see dolphins frolicking offshore or even the majestic Southern Right Whales that visit our shores during their calving season between May and September.

13
Par 4, Length 278m

Short par four with the fairway sloping sharply from right to left. Best to keep as far right as possible off the tee.

14
Par 4, Length 408m

This is the most challenging hole on the course with out-of-bounds on the right; the second shot is made difficult by the wind coming off the sea to the right of the green.

15
Par 3, Length 178m

Spectacularly framed by the ocean this long par three is a wonderful hole to play. It leads to a sloping green which is very difficult to read.

16
Par 4, Length 365m

A sweeping dogleg left this par four has a blind tee shot with the second shot to the green made more difficult by a sloping elevated green.

17
Par 4, Length 367m

Medium length par four over the hill with out-of-bounds close to right hand side of the fairway. Bunkered right and left of green.

18
Par 5, Length 484m

Mens longest par five. Position your shot to the right for the best angle to the green in front of the Clubhouse.

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The Sands, Torquay

2 Sands Boulevard
Torquay, VIC, 3228
Australia

Region: Bellarine Peninsula, Surfcoast & Shipwreck Coast

The Sands, Torquay

The Sands Torquay is a unique links course that winds its way through the natural environment of the coastal location. Designed by Stuart Appleby, the course demonstrates his flair for providing a challenging and unique experience for the golfer. This magnificent course has been constructed with knowledge and experience to create a challenge as well as being an enjoyable play.

This unique links course winds its way through the natural environment of the coastal location Torquay, at the footstep of the famous Victorian Surfcoast. Designed by Stuart Appleby, the course demonstrates his flair for providing a challenging and unique experience for the golfer. This magnificent course has been constructed with knowledge and experience to create a challenge as well as being an enjoyable play. Located 75 minutes drive from Melbourne or 20 minutes drive from Geelong.

The Sands offers Members and Guests all the comforts of a first class course and club. A professionally stocked Proshop, practice facilities, excellent locker and change rooms,Hanners Restaurant and bar, function areas and health club including gymnasium, 25 meter indoor lap pool and tennis courts make The Sands a standout club in every aspect.

Conditions apply
• Golf link card essential for play

Strict dress code
Neat casual golf attire being a collared shirt and dress pants or shorts is necessary, only soft spike golf shoes are to be worn, with either long or short plain white socks. Tracksuit pants, denim, singlets, brief shorts, joggers and thongs are not permitted on the golf course. Any participants not abiding by the regulations will be asked to leave the golf course.

Course Information

Par: 72
ACR: 73
Length (m): 6118
Architect: Stuart Appleby
Design Year: 2004

Playing Tips

1
Par 4, Length 336m

The opening hole is a relatively short par 4, but is tightly bunkered at about 250 meters from the back tee. Long hitters have the option to attempt to carry the cluster of bunkers on the left side, opening up a very short pitch to the green, but the more prudent tee shot might be a three wood just in front of the fairway bunkers.

2
Par 4, Length 318m

The second hole presents a heavily bunkered vision to the golfer, who may be a bit intimidated by the view. In fact there are at least three good options for the tee shot on the shortest par 4 on the course, but the stage for the round has been set. Golfers will see plenty of sand during this adventure, and they will have to use their heads constantly in order to avoid being trapped. The green here is relatively small and tightly bunkered so precision is the key at #2.

3
Par 5, Length 540m

At the long third, golfers are asked to add power to their tee shots, but there is plenty of room to let one fly. Most golfers will opt to head left and if you make it over the rise, a clear shot of the next landing position is clear. The green is perched in the air slightly, helping to make this hole a true three shot par 5, but long hitters can have a go in two if they dare.

4
Par 4, Length 373m

This medium length par 4 offers plenty of room off the tee but has a closely guarded green. The hole is nearly straight away and plays slightly downhill, so it is a good chance for a birdie for those with accurate iron play, if they are not too distracted by the beautiful backdrop of the tidal wetlands.

5
Par 3, Length 178m

The first par 3 on the course plays into the prevailing wind and borders the wetlands, so it presents an intimidating target. The green is well bunkered on the left side, so a draw is favoured for most pin positions. Only the back right pin placement invites a fade approach.

6
Par 4, Length 405m

The sixth hole is perhaps the most difficult challenge on the front nine of The Sands Torquay, and it looks even tougher than it plays. The bunker placement in the landing area presents an intimidating picture, but there is in reality plenty of fairway to receive the tee shot. The line of the second shot must be carefully considered, however, as the bunker on the right side is well short of the green and offers a difficult recovery. For many golfers a little humility in selecting a safe bogey route may be the best strategy.

7
Par 3, Length 162m

At 162 meters the seventh hole is not long, but it is closely and somewhat deceptively bunkered, so having the right club in one's hands may not be a simple matter. The prevailing breeze is slightly across the line of flight and will have a tendency to knock lofted shots down and to the right of the green.

8
Par 4, Length 356m

This medium length par 4 has water down the entire right side, wrapping tightly around the right side of the green. A series of large bunkers protects the left side of the hole and helps turn the hole slightly to the right. The green falls away slowly to the right side, making the pin position on the right side of the green a real challenge.

9
Par 5, Length 460m

There is a clear risk-reward choice for the tee shot. Only a golfer, who challenges the water off the tee, will have a reasonable approach to the green on the second shot. Golfers playing away from the water off the tee will have a much more difficult journey to this closely guarded green.

10
Par 4, Length 360m

The back nine starts with a medium length par 4 that doglegs a little to the right. Golfers looking for birdies should work hard here, as it may be the last good chance. A good tee shot should challenge the right side bunker, opening up the green for the approach, especially the difficult left side pin position.

11
Par 4, Length 435m

The long eleventh hole embodies all of the natural elements of the Torquay site - sand dunes, tall grass, Moonah trees, and even some rock outcrops. Thankfully, the wind is normally at the golfer's back, so a well hit tee shot should clear the small Moonah trees op the left center of the fairway. The fairway splits around a natural slope with four embedded bunkers and rises to a well-protected green, gently tucked into the dunes landscape. If golfers can keep their focus here and not become distracted by the natural beauty of the hole, par is possible.

12
Par 5, Length 510m

This par 5 plays from an elevated tee to a fairway bordered tightly on the right side by a large grove of Moonah trees. Bunkers on the left side define the tee shot and gently bend the hole to the right. The green bends back to the left a bit and has a wetland backdrop.

13
Par 3, Length 148m

The shortest hole on the course plays sharply uphill onto a high ridge that dominates the next two holes. Although the green is pitched towards the golfer, the putting surface will be blind for the most part, so golfers will need to trust the yardage on the card and give the club its full value.

14
Par 4, Length 400m

The fourteenth hole is an excellent example of creating a natural look in context with the stunning surroundings. Although the existing site was not much to look at, the distant dunes backdrop offered inspiration for what has turned out to be one of the most beautiful holes on the course. And it's plenty challenging, especially the second shot to a green set carefully on a side slope, but the wind is normally at one's back, so tee it high and let it fly.

15
Par 4, Length 351m

This relatively short hole is no patsy. The wind is nearly always a factor on the ridge and the drop to the wetland on the entire right side of the hole is severe. This hole begins the four-hole finish of the golf course that will challenge even the best golfers.

16
Par 5, Length 520m

The last par 5 on the course plays across a wetland into the prevailing wind, from an elevated tee. Having successfully reached the generous fairway, the golfer is faced with a narrow opening about 50 meters short of the green. Two big shots will clear the gap and leave the long hitter with an easy pitch, but the wiser play may be short of the bunkers leaving a slightly longer approach.

17
Par 3, Length 210m

This is a long hard par three that plays into the prevailing wind. The hole sets up for a slight fade shot, and is open enough to allow a run-up approach, but there are plenty of bunkers to catch errant shots.

18
Par 4, Length 370m

The golf course ends with a medium length par 4 that bends to the left around a Iarge fairway bunker. The hole plays into the prevailing wind, so it will play at least two clubs longer than the card on most days. The green is closely bunkered on the left side, making the right side of the fairway a better angle to the pin.

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Thirteenth Beach Golf Links (Beach Course)

Geelong Barwon Heads Road
Barwon Heads, VIC, 3227
Australia

Region: Bellarine Peninsula, Surfcoast & Shipwreck Coast

Thirteenth Beach Golf Links (Beach Course)

The Beach Course at Thirteenth Beach Golf Links was opened in December 2001. Located on the stunning Bellarine Peninsula in Victoria, the challenging and natural links style course has received high accolades by many golfing publications. Many of the holes on the course wind their way through high valleys and the fairways provide pure couch fairways from which to hit your shots. The sandy soil upon which the golf course sits ensure excellent drainage in even the heaviest of downpours.

The Beach Course at Thirteenth Beach Golf Links was opened in December 2001. The challenging and natural links style course has already received high accolades, being voted in the countries top 25 golf courses (Golf Australia magazine) and the 12th best public access facility (The Golf Course Guide).

Many of the holes on the course wind their way through high valleys and the natural, moonlike bunkers and scrubbery add to the general unkempt look of the course. That is if you are off the fairway! On the fairway you are greeted with pure couch fairways and good course conditioning all year round. The sandy soil upon which the golf course sits ensure excellent drainage in even the heaviest of downpours.

The first four holes are relatively open and provide a gentle opening for the rest of the course. Focus on starting well on these holes and this will help to set up a good round. The par 3 holes are a feature of the Beach course at Thirteenth Beach and they provide a series of challenges-moreso from what awaits you if you miss than the green rather than the length of the holes.

The Creek Course designed by Tony Cashmore in conjunction with 6 time major championship winner Nick Faldo, is set to be a wonderful complement to The Beach Course, with the accolades and praise expected to continue.

Set on the stunning Bellarine Peninsula in Victoria only 60 minutes from Melbourne, Thirteenth Beach is a 36 hole golf and residential complex forming the basis of some very good golf in this fast growing part of the Victorian golfing scene.

Course Information

Par: 72
ACR: 74
Length (m): 6391
Architect: Tony Cashmore
Design Year: 2001
Top 100: 28

Playing Tips

1
Par 4, Length 317m

The perfect opening hole. The 1st hole of The Beach Course offers the golfer the opportunity to get off to a quick start without being a total walk over. A mid to generous landing area allows golfers the opportunity to hit iron or three wood to get their round started. Played carefully the first hole can be a nice safe par, but hit your drive too far off line and double bogey is not out of the question. The right hand side of the fairway is guarded by three pot bunkers, with rough and sandy wasteland guarding the left hand side. Three bunkers guard the left hand side of this long narrow green, with a secondary cut of fescue grass guarding the right and back of green. TIP: The safest and easiest way to make four on this hole is to place your drive short of the bunkers on the right hand side of fairway, and hit a short iron to the heart of the green. Longer hitters may like to chance their luck at hitting driver at the green leaving either a putt or short chip to the well guarded green. But of course this is easier said than done on the first hole of the day.

2
Par 4, Length 387m

A mid to long par 4, its difficulty is affected by the prevailing winds. Framed down the left hand side by a series of houses, a large crop of eight bunkers entice the player to take the short route home. Players are then confronted by a large putting surface that tilts subtly from left to right, but has many varying slopes to catch the player who hasn’t quite gauged the pace of the greens yet. This is the first contact the golfer has with the residential precinct surrounding Thirteenth Beach, and is a fine example of how well houses with strict covenants can blend into the surrounds. TIP: Avoid the bunkers on this hole to perhaps secure that early birdie. This fairway is wider than it seems. There is a small hump that restricts the golfers view of the rest of the fairway. Hit a drive off the left edge of the bunker on the right hand side, then hit your second shot to the fat part of the green. As the green is not deep club so as your ball lands into or just short of the tier that protects the front of the green.

3
Par 3, Length 180m

A long par three that generally plays into the breeze. This up turned cashew shaped green has a number of pin positions that make obtaining par extremely difficult. Golfers could quite possibly face the longest putt of their careers at this hole, as many a round can be ruined by the early three or four putt. TIP: If your tee shot can’t hit the green be sure that you miss to the short side, as a chip over the large ridge running down the middle of the green can be near impossible.

4
Par 5, Length 462m

A much criticized par five, architect Tony Cashmore designed this hole to fight against the fast rise of titanium drivers and oversized club heads. On some days players will be required to hit just a long iron off the tee to a small throat of fairway that is guarded by a water hazard on the left and cypress trees and a bunker on the right. If conditions allow and players are able, a long iron or a fairway wood can be used from the fairway to reach the green in two. Regulation par can be made by hitting to the right of the fairway traps, then wedging onto the green from about 100 metres. However this hole is greatly effected by the elements and should be played on its merits. TIP: Any drive left of the lone fairway trap will increase the likelihood of an early birdie. If laying up, the clubbing of the third shot is critical, with bunkers guarding the green short and right and a mixture of fescues and swales guarding the back of the green. Although not visible from the fairway there is a large saddle that covers two thirds of green, golf balls falling into this area will often feed off the green and into the fringe. The mini version of St Andrews valley of sin located at the front of the green should also be avoided.

5
Par 4, Length 312m

The beginning of the stretch of holes that Thirteenth Beach has become most famous for. Standing on the tee most players are overawed by the sight of this Par 4. The 3 sets of tees for this hole are located next to the old irrigation pump from when Thirteenth Beach was an asparagus farm. The site of the irrigation now lays dormant and cuts diagonally across the length of the hole. Four huge fairway bunkers have been cut into the side of the hill. Masterfully constructed by shaper Barry Hudson these bunkers stand up and rare at the golfer as they look across the first fairway on the drive to the clubhouse. Perhaps the biggest challenge of these bunkers is not their difficulty but gauging how far they are off the tee. Without the help of a course guide the hole appears a lot longer than it actually plays. Given the right conditions the green is reachable from all three tees. But it does require the golfer to carry their drive in excess of 250metres over a water hazard and bunkers, another example of Cashmore incorporating risk and reward into his players rounds. TIP: Whilst the temptation to impress playing partners or chase that elusive two may be realistic, many a round has been ruined as players miscue or hit flippy hooks into the water. The safest and most effective way to play this hole is to hit a three wood or long iron from the tee leaving about 100 metres to the hole. This allows the golfer to attack the flag stick and hopefully make a birdie on this tiered green.

6
Par 5, Length 531m

Another Par five to attract criticism and praise from golfers around the world. A true three shot hole, players hit from the tee towards a large swampy marshland that is an extension of Murtnaghurt lagoon. The hazard encroaches onto the fairway at approximately 225 leaving the golfer only a small bottle neck that is approximately 20 metres to land drives longer than this distance. It is a rare par five that dictates the way players must play the hole. Only on the strongest of tailwind days can this hole be reached in two strokes, this is what has been criticised by golfers. Golf technology is stretching golf courses to their absolute limit. Modern courses are stretching over 6500 metres and beyond. By creating the true three shot hole Cashmore has tried to restrict the effects of technology, effectively taking the driver out of play. After a successful lay up players can then advance the ball into the fairway, and finally shoot blind to a green protected by dunes reminiscent of those seen in Irish golf pictorals. TIP: From the tee select a club that can hit 190 to 210 metres. This will leave you well placed behind the swampy marshland. Calculate the distance to the final fairway bunker and aim to land just short of it. This will leave a wedge oro a short iron into the green. Be sure to leave your third shot beneath the hole leaving an up hill putt to one of the many hole locations on this green.

7
Par 3, Length 165m

Working your way back up the nearby sand dune to this enclosed tee, the golfer faces one of the most stunning views of the golf course. Looking back across the recently completed sixth hole, the sparkling waters of Murtnaghurt Lagoon and onto the clubhouse it could be quite easy to become transfixed in the surrounding scenery. But the seventh hole requires much greater respect. This magnificently shaped green represents all the wonderful aspects of Links golf. To the left of the hole a small dune sits with two bunkers. On the right hand side of the dune a large grassed area feeds all balls striking its vicinity onto the green. At the front of the green a large tightly cut apron allows the golfer to bounce their ball onto the firm putting surface. The right hand side of the green is protected by many bunkers, including a large deep bunker that protects the back of the green from any shots the slightest bit overclubbed. The first truly great par three on the course. TIP: If the pin is in the middle or to the right hand side of the green, aim at the green side traps to the left and work the ball back to the centre of the green. The natural lie of the land will bounce the ball towards the pin. If the pin is in the left bowl, good luck!

8
Par 4, Length 420m

Similar to the seventh hole the view from the tiger tees here is mind blowing. This hole has changed quite considerably since the course first opened in December 2001. From the two sets of tees the golfer is faced with a large landing area that bottles into a small neck of fairway protected by bunkers. In typical Cashmore style the landing area is quite large for the not so experienced player and gets narrower the further the ball gets advanced down the fairway. A small bunker on the left hand side of the fairway, and two fairway bunkers on the right hand side create this bottle neck type effect. The only bunkerless green on the golf course awaits as players are forced to shoot blindly into this bowl shaped green. It is hard to get it close to the pin on this green as judging the distance can be near impossible. The green is fairly flat with only hole locations at the back of the green causing any real dilemmas. TIP: Play down the right hand side of this fairway from the tee, aiming directly at fairway traps. This will leave the shortest route to the green. The second shot can be played in a number of ways. Because the green sits in a bowl those players just wanting to find the surface can hit the ball in from the right or left and let it feed off the slopes. To get the ball close to the flag, aim directly at the entrance to the green.

9
Par 4, Length 418m

A strong finish to a tough opening stretch. Whilst good scores can definitely be posted on the front nine, no hole should be taken for granted. The 9th hole posts a much more difficult challenge. From the tee the fairway doglegs dramatically to the right hand side. A large sandy wasteland begins at about 100metres off the tee and stretches the length of the drive. Another risk reward hole that allows players to bite off as much as they can chew. The stony wasteland is unpleasant to play from and should be avoided at all costs. After finding the fairway, the player is confronted with arguably the most difficult approach shot on the golf course. Down wind and down hill to a very narrow green.

10
Par 4, Length 376m

Strong Par that plays back into the prevailing southerly. The further you drive the ball the more narrow the fairway becomes. The fairway allows the player to hit it left or right off the tee, but the closer you are to the right rough, the further you have to the hole. A long narrow green makes long iron approaches extremely difficult, and a set of three bunkers guard for those shots leaking slightly right. TIP: Drive it down the left hand side trying to keep it as close as possible to the bunkers, this will leave the shortest approach shot to the hole. A ball left below the hole gives the best chance for that elusive birdie.

11
Par 5, Length 491m

One of the best Par 5’s in the country. A well played hole will deliver a birdie, a poorly played hole could deliver a 10. The property’s perimeter fencing which is out of bounds guards the left hand side, and a set of two fairway bunkers and tea tree guard the right. One of the tightest fairways on the golf course, not only do players have to thread their drive through a series of hazards they must combat the left to right southerly that sweeps this hole. A drive down the middle presents the golfer with an opportunity to hit the green in two, but a poor shot will find trouble with sand and tea tree guarding the green. An undulating green makes putting difficult, but a well struck putt will get its rewards. TIP: Find the fairway at all costs, even if this means hitting three wood or a long iron from the tee. Unless your one of the longer hitters, lay up on your third. There is a small pot bunker in the middle of the fairway, either just short or long of the bunker will give a flat third shot into the green. Locate where the pin is on this hole as depth perception can be quite difficult.

12
Par 3, Length 156m

Regarded by many as one of the most aesthetically pleasing holes in the country. This natural Par 3 looks and feels like it was on the property just waiting for the grass to be mown and golfers to play it. Like the eleventh, good shots are rewarded with birdie opportunities, but a Par 3 is a fine accomplishment on this hole. Many hole locations determine how the hole should be played, asking the golfer to hit a variety of shots to different portions of this large green. TIP: Take half a club more than what you think is needed and aim for the centre of the green using the back dune as protection. Don’t be short as an up & down is quite difficult.

13
Par 4, Length 321m

Another piece of architectural artistry. A short walk from the 12th green through a set of dunes, players are greeted with a narrow elevated tee box through a narrow shoot. A nest of bunkers guard the right hand side of the fairway beginning at 220m and continuing to the green. Sandy wasteland, tussocks and tea tree guard the left hand side. The green is a small three tiered green, that slopes from left to right, with all balls missing the green coming to rest in fescue beside the green. TIP: Position is everything. Iron or three wood off the tee hit close up to the right hand bunkers. This will leave the best angle to this green. Distance control is everything. Play the ball to the left and let it feed back toward the hole.

14
Par 5, Length 514m

A strong Par 5, playing along one of the residential precincts. This fairway is wider than it seems, with a lot of room and the best line of play down the left hand side. A set of cross bunkers about 100metres from the hole are in place to capture those trying to lay up, with the deep bunkers guarding the left side of the green. TIP: Hit it down the left side off the tee, don’t even flirt with the fairway bunkers on the hill as they shouldn’t be in play. For the longer hitters shoot at the green and avoid the bunkers on the left, for those laying up, aim to leave yourself about 120m. This green is also quite long, so ensure enough club is taken for the approach shot.

15
Par 4, Length 358m

The start of a strong quartet of holes. The fifteen requires players to hit a long iron or three wood to the end of the fairway, approximately 230m off the tee. A mid to short iron is required. The southerly breeze plays great effect on this hole, with most second shots worked in from the left side, bunkers guard the right side of the green. TIP: Play down the left of the fairway to give the best angle and shortest route into this green. It is better to overclub on this hole as the green is quite long. Avoid the bunkers on the right hand side.

16
Par 3, Length 114m

The signature hole of Thirteenth Beach: Perched on top of a sand dune this postage stamped size green has ruined many a round as it is surrounded by pot bunkers with severe run offs to tangled fesue grass. Anywhere from a four iron to sand wedge can be used on this hole depending on the wind. TIP: Land it on the green. Take enough club and leave the ball below the hole. Balls missing the green can result in any amount of strokes.

17
Par 4, Length 394m

Strong modern Par 4. Hole doglegs to the right with players required to hit a long iron into one of the largest greens on the course. Fairway bunkers guard the left and right hand side of the hole, as well as a rocky wasteland to the right. The green is split into four quadrants guarded by a large swale running both vertically and horizontally. A very good test of a players shot - making skills. TIP: Hug the right hand side of the fairway staying close to the fairway traps. This leaves the best angle and the shortest distance to the hole. If the pin is in the front portion of the green the back tier can be used as a backstop.

18
Par 4, Length 404m

Aim your drive at the apex of the Clubhouse, which is visible in the foreground. You will then be faced with a tricky second shot into a well tiered green, which is well set in the shape of a "bowl". A par on this will be a very good finish.

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Thirteenth Beach Golf Links (Creek Course)

Geelong Barwon Heads Road
Barwon Heads, VIC, 3227
Australia

Region: Bellarine Peninsula, Surfcoast & Shipwreck Coast

Thirteenth Beach Golf Links (Creek Course)

Thirteenth Beach Golf Links was once an asparagus farm and is now one of the finest golf courses in the land. Set on the stunning Bellarine Peninsula in Victoria, Thirteenth Beach is a 36 hole golf and residential complex. The challenging and natural links style Beach course has already received high accolades. The Creek course, designed by Tony Cashmore in conjunction with 6 time major championship winner Nick Faldo, is a wonderful complement to the Beach course.

Thirteenth Beach Golf Links was once an asparagus farm however has now been transformed into a 36 hole golf and residential complex set on the stunning Bellarine Peninsula in Victoria. The Creek course, designed by Tony Cashmore in conjunction with 6 time major championship winner Nick Faldo, is a wonderful complement to the Beach course.

The Creek Course certainly requires much strategy on its big long sloping fairways which are generally wide and open but the myriad of bunkers strategically placed in fairways and around greens ensure the golfer must be vigilant at all times. The Creek course has been described to have the feel of the very best of Melbourne's sand belt through its gently rolling terrain and broadly separated fairways. The course abounds with gentle contours, large, multi levelled greens and a routing that meanders its way through scattered pine trees and across open parkland.  

Course Information

Par: 71
ACR: 72
Length (m): 6401
Architect: Nick Faldo
Design Year: 2004
Top 100: 74

Playing Tips

1
Par 4, Length 342m

The opening hole, a gentle 342m dogleg, immediately introduces the visually striking bunkering, and offers heroic options off the tee depending on player ability.

2
Par 5, Length 504m

The par 5 second presents a sea of bunkers left of the green, with more sand on the right.

3
Par 3, Length 172m

Exposed to the elements, the third typically plays with a lefttoright cross southerly wind. A wide, shallow twotiered green demands accuracy from the tee shot to avoid a difficult putt. Going long here is not an option, and definitely should be avoided.

4
Par 4, Length 419m

The fourth hole is a tough 419m par 4 from the championship tee (386m from the blue medal tee) that doglegs sharply left and uphill to a huge green surrounded by treacherous bumps and slopes. Under favourable conditions big hitters can fly the trap on the corner, but must still avoid a stand of pines that runs down the left side.

5
Par 4, Length 431m

The fifth is the longest par 4 on course, however rarely plays its full length. The drive should be positioned right to avoid protruding fairway bunkers and out of bounds left. Greenside cypress trees create a difficult approach, often necessitating a shaped shot. When contemplating club selection, its better to have more club than end up short.

6
Par 3, Length 129m

The sixth, a 129m par 3 is already a sensational hole, with a delightful green tucked between mature tortured pines in a setting that was just too good for the designers to ignore. Faldo has predicted that the greenside bunker will rank amongst the world's best, and has retained the services of shaper Barry Hudsen (The Dunes and The Beach Course) for a Faldo project in Kansas, USA.

7
Par 5, Length 479m

The manmade rocky and sandy 'creek' first comes into play on the 479m par 5 seventh hold, cutting strategically across the fairway just 70m short of the green, and demanding a 'layup' or 'go for it' decision from many.

8
Par 4, Length 362m

On the 362m eighth the creek is a water hazard down the right of the fairway, before cutting across in front of a very tricky elevated green.

9
Par 4, Length 290m

The ninth hole, where Cashmore based his green on the 12th of the Old Course St Andrews, with a 40m long, narrow putting surface flanked by bunkers either side and three more beyond has turned out a much shorter hole than first envisaged, at just 290m. The sensible strategy is just to avoid the sea of bunkers that lurk a pitching iron from the green.

10
Par 5, Length 526m

The tenth typically plays like a true threeshot par 5 due to its length of over 500 metres. The creek that runs across the width of the fairway influences the second shot, and should be accounted for. Ensure you leave the ball below the hole on a long green that slopes from back to front.

11
Par 4, Length 411m

The eleventh hold is a monstrous dogleg of 411m, but big hitters can currently cut the corner bunker with their drive and significantly shorten the approach. Faldo has suggested a nest of bunkers in the left rough and a bunker midfairway at around 250m, which would definitely provide a more strategic test.

12
Par 3, Length 219m

At 219 metres, this par 3 plays a lot harder than its rating. A long green with a narrow opening demands an accurate tee shot. A severe slope left will no doubt catch any slightly errant shot. Bail out left is an option, though presents a difficult chip to in order to salvage par.

13
Par 4, Length 341m

Two small pines either side of the fairway frame the beautiful setting for the thirteenth green, with more trees beyond.

14
Par 4, Length 316m

The theme is repeated from the thirteenth for the fourteenth where two giant 'goal posts' stand just 10m apart in direct line from tee to green. A safer route to the right presents a more challenging approach.

15
Par 3, Length 179m

The fifteenth hole is a par 3 of 179m over the course's water storage dam to a hillside green.

16
Par 4, Length 380m

A recent lengthening of the hole brings the large centre fairway trap into play, however shouldnt affect the longer hitter. A tee shot positioned right of centre will benefit the second shot, due to an imposing left greenside trap. A relatively flat putting surface is difficult to hold; dont carry the approach all the way to the flag.

17
Par 5, Length 478m

The seventeenth is a short par 5 of 478m, but the challenge is to negotiate the diagonal fairway bunkers and then the creek crossing.

18
Par 4, Length 423m

The final hole is a strong 423m par to another superb large and sloping green with surrounds that demand great touch to save par from those who miss the putting surface with their approach.

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Torquay Golf Club

1 Great Ocean Road
Torquay, VIC, 3228
Australia

Region: Bellarine Peninsula, Surfcoast & Shipwreck Coast

Torquay Golf Club

Course Information

Par: 72
ACR:
Length (m):
Architect:
Design Year:

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About the Destination

Mornington Peninsula Location Map

Less than 5 years ago the area known as the Bellarine Peninsula, Surf Coast and Shipwreck Coast was more well known for its surf beaches than its golf courses. Starting 65 minutes southwest of Melbourne (and just beyond the city of Geelong) this area has grown significantly in golfing terms with the addition of a large number of new courses.

This region is an ideal self drive location where you start at the beginning of the Peninsula and over 2 to 5 days can meander your way through series of new and well established courses—each offering different golfing challenges.

Starting on the other side of Geelong the little coastal town of Barwon Heads is home to three courses worthy of playing. Barwon Heads Golf Club is a private member's course offering limited non member access through GOLFSelect and contains a series of holes that Tom Watson, amongst others, has heaped high praise upon. The wind is a constant companion at Barwon Heads and the encroaching tee tree on many of the holes will catch errant tee shots. Barwon Heads is probably most famous for its 13th hole—a 130m par 3 with a postage stamp size green and severe contours which feed the ball off the green if not struck perfectly.

From the 13th tee at Barwon Heads the golfer can stare across open grasslands to Thirteenth Beach Golf Links - a new 36 hole golf development with courses by Tony Cashmore (Beach Course) and multiple major winner Nick Faldo (Creek Course). Similar in topography to Barwon Heads the Beach course offers many comparable challenges and belies its age in terms of the course maturity. The Creek course has also matured over the last few years since its opening and provides a nice companion for its sister course. 

Heading further down the peninsula lies the sleepy surf coast town of Torquay which until recently was famous for its hosting of many professional surfing events. Stuart Appleby (Top Australian golfer) has put his design stamp on a new course known as The Sands - Torquay. Built right up against the ocean it offers a rugged set of holes with perfect fairway conditioning, cragged shaped bunkers and true greens.

Twenty minutes down the road from Torquay lies another surf town - that of Anglesea. The golf course at Anglesea is nothing special in terms of golf architecture. What sets this course apart from anything most visitors outside of Australia are unlikely to have experienced is the proliferation of kangaroos which are a constant companion on the golf course. The kangaroos are in their hundreds and are quite used to dodging the wayward shot that does not quite hit its target.

Further down the road a couple of hours lies the main Western District township of Warrnambool. Situated on the coast this thriving country town offers the chance to stock up on needed supplies before continuing onwards. Warrnambool Golf Club is a well regarded course in this region and the combination of tee tree lined fairways, natural sand bunkers and a friendly all round feel to the place makes it a course worth visiting.

A short 20 minute drive from Warrnambool lies the sleepy town of Port Fairy - a quaint fishing town which hosts an annual folk festival, has some cosy bed and breakfast accommodation and is home to Port Fairy Golf Club, a golf course located on the edge of the water well worth playing. The ocean views afforded on a number of the holes (12,14,15,16) are worth the inexpensive green fee alone and the work being done on this course will ensure it only gets better over time.

The Bellarine Peninsula, Surf Coast and Shipwreck Coast is only getting better and this well kept secret is now becoming more and more well known. It is certainly worth a visit.

Useful Facts and Figures

Below are some useful facts and figures for the Bellarine Peninsula Region. Use these to work out the best time to visit this region.

Month
Min Temp
(C/F)
Max Temp
(C/F)
Sunrise
Sunset
Avg Rainfall
(mm)
Jan
18/64
31/88
6.15am 
8.45pm 
50
Feb
19/66
30/87
6.50am 
8.20pm 
45
Mar
17/63
29/84
7.15am 
7.40pm
50
Apr
14/57
24/75
6.45am 
5.50pm 
55
May
13/55
20/67
7.15am
5.20pm 
55
Jun
10/50
18/64
7.30am
5.05pm
50
Jul
8/47
16/60
7.30am
5.20pm
50
Aug
9/49
18/64
7.00am
5.45pm
50
Sep
11/51
20/67
6.20am
6.10pm 
60
Oct
12/54
23/74
5.30am
6.40pm
65
Nov
15/59
26/78
6.00am
8.10pm 
60
Dec
16/61
28/82
5.55am
8.40pm 
60