Overview

At a Glance

  • Package

    12 nights / 7 games

  • When

    Flexible dates as desired

  • Accommodation

    2 x nights at Westin Hotel Sydney (5 star)

    4 x nights at The Langham, Melbourne (5 star)

    2 x nights at Peppers Moonah Links (5 star)

    2 x nights at Harvest Lodge (4.5 star)

    2 x nights at The Lodge at Kauri Cliffs (5 star)

  • Golf

    (7 games of golf with shared motorised carts)

    1 x The New South Wales GC

    1 x The Royal Melbourne GC (West)

    1 x The Metropolitan GC

    1 x Kingston Heath GC

    1 x The National GC (Old)

    1 x Cape Kidnappers GC

    1 x Kauri Cliffs GC

  • Drive

    Return airport transfers

    Return golf transfers

  • Sights

    Sightseeing option for 1 day

Our 13 day Australia and New Zealand sampler will give you a taste of some of the great golf courses of these two countries and have you wanting to come back and play more (and believe you me we can offer you plenty of additional golf experiences for next time).

The itinerary starts in the Olympic city where you play the best course in Sydney - the spectacular NSW Golf Club located at La Perouse. From here you head to Melbourne and an veritable feast of wonderful golf. Over the next six days you will play three of the famed Melbourne Sandbelt courses and then head down to the golf rich Mornington Peninsula where you will experience another two highly regarded courses.

From here you cross the Tasman and over to New Zealand where some truly spectacular cliff top courses - Kauri Cliffs and Cape Kidnappers awaits you. And at the end of this you have to head home where no doubt planning will have already begun for your next trip "Down Under".

Itinerary Day-by-Day

Day 1
Sights Arrive in Sydney and spend part of day sightseeing.
Accommodation
Westin Hotel Sydney   
The Westin Sydney is an award winning, five star hotel set in the heart of Sydney's CBD. Part of the redevelopment of Sydney's historic General Post Office on Martin Place, this luxurious hotel is surrounded by Sydney's most exclusive designer shopping, best restaurants, theatres and nightlife, and is close to attractions like Darling Harbor, Sydney Opera House and the Harbour Bridge.
Day 2
Golf
The New South Wales Golf Club (4 golfers with motorised cart) 
The NSW Golf Club is rated in the top 50 golf courses in the world. In fact, it is the only Sydney Course rated in the top 100 best golf courses listing. The character of the course is unique, a links style course set amongst the hills and valleys that hug the rugged Pacific Ocean coastline boasting magnificent ocean views as backdrop.
Accommodation
Westin Hotel Sydney   
The Westin Sydney is an award winning, five star hotel set in the heart of Sydney's CBD. Part of the redevelopment of Sydney's historic General Post Office on Martin Place, this luxurious hotel is surrounded by Sydney's most exclusive designer shopping, best restaurants, theatres and nightlife, and is close to attractions like Darling Harbor, Sydney Opera House and the Harbour Bridge.
Day 3
Flights Fly from Melbourne to Sydney in the morning.
Golf
The Royal Melbourne Golf Club (West Course) (4 golfers with pull buggy) 
The Royal Melbourne Golf Club is a 36 hole private members club located in the heart of the world famous Melbourne Sandbelt golf region. The West Course is regularly rated as the number one rated golf course in Australia (and was recently ranked number 6 in the world) and was designed by world renowned golf course architect Dr Alistair MacKenzie. The natural peaks and troughs in the terrain have been used to maximum benefit with strategically designed and memorable holes throughout.
Accommodation
The Langham, Melbourne   
The Langham, Melbourne affords five star service and quality in a five star location - the south bank of the Yarra River. Nestled on the south bank of the Yarra River, the hotel is within easy reach of the city's business district, fashion, shopping, sport, parks and gardens, al fresco restaurants, cafes and nightlife.
Day 4
Sights No golf planned. Sightseeing option.
Accommodation
The Langham, Melbourne   
The Langham, Melbourne affords five star service and quality in a five star location - the south bank of the Yarra River. Nestled on the south bank of the Yarra River, the hotel is within easy reach of the city's business district, fashion, shopping, sport, parks and gardens, al fresco restaurants, cafes and nightlife.
Day 5
Golf
The Metropolitan Golf Club (4 golfers with pull buggy) 
The Metropolitan Golf Club is one of Australia's premier golf courses. Tucked quietly in Melbourne's south eastern suburbs it is one of the renowned "sandbelt courses" and widely recognised as one of the finest golf courses in Australia. It has also been described as the Australian equivalent of Augusta National. The perfect fairways, marbletop greens and blindingly white bunkers all combine to offer a test of golf not seen previously in Australia. Metropolitan is a tough but fair test of golf.
Accommodation
The Langham, Melbourne   
The Langham, Melbourne affords five star service and quality in a five star location - the south bank of the Yarra River. Nestled on the south bank of the Yarra River, the hotel is within easy reach of the city's business district, fashion, shopping, sport, parks and gardens, al fresco restaurants, cafes and nightlife.
Day 6
Golf
Kingston Heath Golf Club (4 golfers with pull buggy) 
Kingston Heath Golf Club is universally regarded as one of the best manicured courses in Australia and arguably the world. Its strategic bunkering and clever use of dips and hollows fools the non observant golfer and any deviation from the fairway is generally met with a challenging recovery. The course was built on a compact parcel of land resulting in some of the best short par 4's and world class par 3 holes.
Coach After golf drive to Mornington Peninsula (80 min)
Accommodation
Peppers Moonah Links   
Located on Victoria's Mornington Peninsula, Peppers Moonah Links Resort is one of Australia's most unique leisure resorts, featuring luxury accommodation, two 18 hole championship golf courses and an endota spa.
Day 7
Accommodation
Peppers Moonah Links   
Located on Victoria's Mornington Peninsula, Peppers Moonah Links Resort is one of Australia's most unique leisure resorts, featuring luxury accommodation, two 18 hole championship golf courses and an endota spa.
Day 8
Golf
The National Golf Club (Old Course) (4 golfers with motorised cart) 
The National Golf Club is a private members golf club and Australia's first to offer access to 72 holes of first class quality golf offering incredible variety and endless challenges. All four courses are regularly included in the listings of Australia's Top 100 courses. Your golf on the Old Course will be punctuated with spectacular views of the coastline, abundant challenge and great variety from the premier Robert Trent-Jones Jnr course in Australia.
Accommodation
The Langham, Melbourne   
The Langham, Melbourne affords five star service and quality in a five star location - the south bank of the Yarra River. Nestled on the south bank of the Yarra River, the hotel is within easy reach of the city's business district, fashion, shopping, sport, parks and gardens, al fresco restaurants, cafes and nightlife.
Day 9
Flights 12:00 PM Flight NZ0006 Melbourne to Auckland (arr 5:20pm). 6:55pm Flight NZ8409 Auckland to Napier (arr 7:55pm). Transfer to accommodation (30 min)
Accommodation
Harvest Lodge   
Harvest Lodge is ideally located 4.5 star accommodation in the upmarket village of Havelock North near Hastings - in the heart of Hawkes Bay Wine Country. Its close proximity to Cape Kidnappers Golf Course makes it the ideal base for golfers visiting the region.
Day 10
Golf
Cape Kidnappers Golf Course (4 golfers with motorised cart) 
Cape Kidnappers is a Tom Doak designed golf course which is amongst the world's most spectacular courses. The clever use of the layout is best seen from the air where Doak has used the natural landscape to craft some magnificent, memorable, and challenging golf holes. However, the Cape Kidnappers experience starts from the moment you drive in the entrance gate. What follows is a 10-kilometer drive (yes that is correct) leading you up to the shearing shed designed clubhouse. The long drive helps to build the anticipation of the day ahead as one passes through a pine plantation, a working cattle farm where sheep abound, across streams and along roads cut out from sheer faced cliffs.
Accommodation
Harvest Lodge   
Harvest Lodge is ideally located 4.5 star accommodation in the upmarket village of Havelock North near Hastings - in the heart of Hawkes Bay Wine Country. Its close proximity to Cape Kidnappers Golf Course makes it the ideal base for golfers visiting the region.
Day 11
Flights 04:25 PM Flight NZ8414 Napier to Auckland (arr 5:25pm). 6:55pm NZ2668 Auckland to Kerikeri (arr 7:35pm)
Accommodation
The Lodge at Kauri Cliffs   
Kauri Cliffs consists of eleven outlying guest cottages, each with two guest suites providing twenty-two accommodation units at Kauri Cliffs.
Day 12
Golf
Kauri Cliffs (4 golfers with motorised cart) 
Kauri Cliffs is one of those surreal golf experiences that avid golfers should experience at least once in their lifetime. Fifteen holes view the Pacific Ocean, six of which are played alongside cliffs which plunge to the sea. The beautiful inland holes wind through marsh, forest and farmland.
Accommodation
The Lodge at Kauri Cliffs   
Kauri Cliffs consists of eleven outlying guest cottages, each with two guest suites providing twenty-two accommodation units at Kauri Cliffs.
Day 13
Flights 02:30 PM Flight NZ2665 Kerikeri to Auckland (arr 3:10pm). 7:30pm NZ0006 Auckland to Los Angeles (arr 10:25am - same day)

Golf Courses

Cape Kidnappers Golf Course

448 Clifton Road
Te Awanga, Hawke's Bay, NZNORTH
New Zealand

Region: Hawke's Bay

Cape Kidnappers Golf Course

Cape Kidnappers is a Tom Doak designed golf course which is amongst the world's most spectacular courses. The clever use of the layout is best seen from the air where Doak has used the natural landscape to craft some magnificent, memorable, and challenging golf holes. However, the Cape Kidnappers experience starts from the moment you drive in the entrance gate. What follows is a 10-kilometer drive (yes that is correct) leading you up to the shearing shed designed clubhouse. The long drive helps to build the anticipation of the day ahead as one passes through a pine plantation, a working cattle farm where sheep abound, across streams and along roads cut out from sheer faced cliffs.

Cape Kidnappers is a Tom Doak designed golf course which is amongst the world's most spectacular courses. The clever use of the layout is best seen from the air where Doak has used God created "fingers" of land to craft some memorable (and challenging) golf holes.

However the Cape Kidnappers experience starts from the moment you drive in the entrance gate. What follows is a 10 kilometre drive (yes that is correct) leading you up to the shearing shed designed clubhouse. The long drive helps to build the anticipation of the day ahead as one passes through a pine plantation, a working cattle farm where sheep abound, across streams and along roads cut out from sheer faced cliffs.

Once you do arrive and mange to collect your thoughts you are faced with a golf course combining a series of clever, inland holes and the memorable cliff top holes. One such clifftop hole is the 15th hole, known as the Pirates Plank. From the tee shot to the green the fairway becomes progressively narrower until you reach the green where it is barely 20 metres across. And on one side lies a sheer faced cliff plunging downward into the Pacific Ocean.

Wind is an everpresent factor at Cape Kidnappers and is enjoyed not by golfer but by the very populous gannet bird colony which seem to float and "windsurf" above the clifftop holes for what seems to be an eternity.

Meticulous attention to detail in the golf course conditioning and five star service in the clubhouse ensure a golfing experience of a lifetime.

And what better way to end a piece on "Kidnappers" than to refer to some comments from the designer Tom Doak - "Our goal in designing golf courses is to create interesting holes you wouldn't find anywhere else. That wasn't hard to do at Cape Kidnappers, because the site is not like anywhere else in golf. If it were any bigger or any more dramatic, it would probably be cordoned off as a national park. It's an overwhelming experience to stand up on the cliffs, 140 meters above sea level, and look out across the waves far below in Hawke's Bay.

Cape Kidnappers is not true links terrain, with the wrinkles of sand dunes; instead the land tilts toward the sea as a series of ridges jutting out toward the edge of the cliffs. Yet, the play is seaside golf at its finest. The surface is firm and fast, the conditions can be windy, and the player who can control his trajectory will be master of the course. You'll hit shots over the tops of the tea trees, and play along the edges of deep ravines. If you stray on your approaches, you'll actually hope to get caught up in bunkers hanging off the green's edge, some of them deeper than you've ever seen before".

Course Information

Par: 72
ACR: 76
Length (m): 6525
Architect: Tom Doak
Design Year: 2004

Playing Tips

1
Par 4, Length 402m

A difficult opening hole is a prelude of things to come. The right half of the fairway offers a better angle into the green, but don't try to cut the corner of the dogleg where a deep gully lies in wait. Short hitters must beware the gully on their second shots, but once over it, there is plenty of room to the right of the flag.

2
Par 5, Length 494m

You must avoid two sets of fairway bunkers here, or you won't reach this green in regulation. Play the drive safely to the left, and lay up short of the cross bunkers if you're not sure you can carry them with your second shot. The green is open on the left, but it tilts sharply to the right so it's difficult to get down in two from the left edge.

3
Par 3, Length 187m

The green is partially hidden by the front bunkers, but it's one of the largest on the course. Aim fifteen feet to the right of the hole to take the left side out of play. Pay extra attention in reading this green as there are a lot of small breaks.

4
Par 5, Length 497m

A solid tee shot just inside the fairway bunker sets you up for a big decision with the second. The safe play is to lay up just short of the deep fairway bunker, but better players will be tempted to aim out to the left of the green and fade the ball home. The green has a high tier in the back, play your approach long and left to give yourself the easiest two-putt.

5
Par 4, Length 384m

A huge fairway is divided by two deep fairway bunkers. Most players are better off aiming down the right side, but long hitters might choose to go left so they don't run out of room. Going for a flag on the left side of this green requires a great deal of nerve.

6
Par 3, Length 206m

An epic par-3 across a deep gully. Miss to the left and you can kiss your ball goodbye, but the green does bank sharply from right to left to steer balls back toward the hole -- if you can reach the green, that is!

7
Par 4, Length 414m

An important tee shot, because a strong drive will carry the crest of the fairway and leave a considerably shorter approach; aim to the right center of this fairway. The downhill second shot is one of the most exhilirating on the course, but the green is a narrow target from the top of the hill.

8
Par 3, Length 166m

This short hole plays over a gully filled with ti trees. It's all carry to the green, and uphill to boot, so take an extra club (or even two). There is some hidden fairway to the right of the green, which is the only safe place to miss.

9
Par 4, Length 369m

Always take the high road here; from the forward tees it's better to hit a 3-wood or iron to keep your ball in view. Take dead aim for the center of the green on your approach; there is a bit of fairway short and right, but the contours of the green make it very difficult to save par from there.

10
Par 4, Length 430m

Another critical tee shot, which should favor the right half of the fairway. The second shot sets up for a running approach which will feed to the hole from right to left, but you have to get the weight just right, as bunkers lurk short left and over the back.

11
Par 3, Length 205m

A difficult par-3 which plays longer than it looks. The green is sharply tilted from back to front, so the front hole locations are the toughest -- it's a much wider target in the back.

12
Par 4, Length 421m

This is the most wide-open driving hole on the course, and a great place to let it rip, because you want the shortest second shot you can get. The green is set at the end of a narrow ridge, profiled against Hawke's Bay. Play for the front right quadrant to keep the left side out of play.

13
Par 3, Length 119m

The shortest hole on the course, but big numbers lurk all around this green, which is easy to reach but hard to stay on. Always play for the back right quadrant, since seemingly good shots can run off the front left of the green into the bunkers below.

14
Par 4, Length 318m

The shortest par-4 on the course is quite possibly the hardest of them all. The green is dominated by a deep pot bunker at the left front and a steep drop at the back, so the safest play is to the far left. Be especially careful around this green, as the pot bunker has a gravitational pull far greater than its size.

15
Par 5, Length 594m

The key to a long par five is staying in the short grass, especially when there is a 140-metre cliff on the left and a 20-metre drop on the right. Don't even go look over the left edge of the fairway if you are afraid of heights. Four short and straight shots will win the hole more often than not.

16
Par 5, Length 457m

The tee, guarded by seagulls, is the only place on the course with a view to Black Reef. If you're not a candidate to reach this green in two, it's better to lay back to the widest part of the fairway from the tee, then stay right with your second for the best view of the green.

17
Par 4, Length 423m

No laying back here: you'll need to hit your two best shots to get home in regulation on this uphill par four. Those uncertain of carrying the greenside bunkers can play safely to the right; if you drive in the rough it might be better to play straight ahead on the second and then pitch your third over the bunkers.

18
Par 4, Length 439m

A counter-intuitive finishing hole, with its green offset to the right of the fairway. The punchbowl green setting will lure many players into aiming left for safety and hoping for a lucky bounce down onto the green. Be careful on this green, as putts from behind the hole can easily get away from you.

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Kingston Heath Golf Club

Kingston Road
Cheltenham, VIC, 3192
Australia

Region: Melbourne Sandbelt

Kingston Heath Golf Club

Kingston Heath Golf Club is universally regarded as one of the best manicured courses in Australia and arguably the world. Its strategic bunkering and clever use of dips and hollows fools the non observant golfer and any deviation from the fairway is generally met with a challenging recovery. The course was built on a compact parcel of land resulting in some of the best short par 4's and world class par 3 holes.

Kingston Heath Golf Club is one of Australia's best golf courses. Currently ranked as the number 2 course in Australia and the 27th best course in the world, Kingston Heath enjoys an enviable reputation for its superb conditioning all year round.

The 18 holes were built on only 125 hectares (most courses in the modern era are built on over 250 hectares), it is perfectly manicured and its bunkering and clever use of dips and hollows visually fools the non observant golfer.

Many people would argue it is a more aesthetically pleasing course than the nearby Royal Melbourne, however if you wildly deviate from the fairway, the rough (comprising long grass, tea tree and sandy scrapes) will test your ability to get the ball back into play.

The 14th hole is a longish par 5 which, depending on the wind direction, can tempt the golfer into reaching the green for 2. One golfer Roger Mackay did better than that in a tournament at the Heath when he holed his second shot for an albatross.

The three par 3 holes are a feature of Kingston Heath and show off one fantastic feature of this great golf course - the classic, natural bunkering. The fifteenth hole, in particular, is a real test ( not necessarily needed towards the end of your round).

An uphill par 3 of moderate length, the path to the hole is surrounded by a myriad of bunkers (some of them very deep) all waiting to swallow the errant tee shot. If you reach the putting surface par is still not guaranteed as the undulating green gives up more 3 putts than 1 putts.

The remaining finishing holes are long par 4's and can ruin an otherwise good score. The 16th is known in golfing circles as the hole where Greg Norman took a 9 on his way to losing a tournament at Kingston Heath in the 1990's. Norman carved his tee shot into the right hand tea tree and it was all downhill from there.

Kingston Heath has hosted the Australian Open 8 times (7 men’s & 1 women’s) as well as hosting the 2009 Australian Masters. This event saw world number 1 golfer Tiger Woods grace the fairways of KH, and he didn’t disappoint, displaying superb shot-making over 4 rounds to take out the yellow jacket.

Kingston Heath is a wonderful golf course and a true delight to play. If you can manage to play a round there it is worth the effort - you will not be disappointed.

Course Information

Par: 72
ACR: 74
Length (m): 6352
Architect: Dan Soutar (bunkering by Alister Mackenzie)
Design Year: 1925
Top 100: 2

Playing Tips

1
Par 4, Length 418m

A long, accurate drive is required on this straight par four. Heavy rough and fairway bunkers make the first shot most demanding. An excellent starting hole.

2
Par 4, Length 351m

A well placed tee shot will leave only a short, uninterrupted pitch to the green. However, heavy timber on the left could spell trouble for any wayward shots or shortcut attempts. Accuracy, not distance, is the key.

3
Par 4, Length 269m

This is the shortest par four on the course. Most players will be looking for birdies here, but the terraced green is very undulating and could turn a potential one-putt into three.

4
Par 4, Length 357m

The fairway is wide open, but a drive to the left affords the best approach to the heavily bunkered green. Once again, the green has many undulations and slopes from back to front.

5
Par 3, Length 173m

Although this is the longest par three on the course, it is a fairly straightforward hole. There are plenty of sand traps on both sides, but the size of the green provides reasonable margin for error off the tee.

6
Par 4, Length 393m

A difficult par four requiring a long drive and a long second shot. A string of bunkers waits to snare any approach straying right, although the area around the green itself is fairly clear.

7
Par 5, Length 460m

The par five seventh hole is a definite birdie or eagle chance. Drive down the left centre of the fairway, short of the cross bunker. I favour a fairway wood or long iron to pass the small swale at the entrance of the green. Any shot short of the swale is very difficult to judge.

8
Par 4, Length 398m

Another long par four requiring placement off the tee. The drive must be kept left to open up the green and avoid fairway traps and rough on the corner of the dogleg. The green is severely bunkered on the left.

9
Par 4, Length 328m

A relief, but accuracy is essential. Many will use an iron from the tee. The green slopes from left to right and is virtually surrounded by bunkers and thick bush.

10
Par 3, Length 128m

There should be plenty of birdies on this short hole, but any misdirected shots will finish in either heavy rough or one of the numerous bunkers, which surround the green.

11
Par 4, Length 378m

This hole has many pitfalls. Fairway bunkers just over 200 metres from the tee, heavy timber on either side, and an out of bounds behind the narrow green. There will be more bogeys than birdies on this tough hole.

12
Par 5, Length 509m

A solid par 5, and a real birdie chance with three well executed shots. However, the players, who take the shortest line along the left, must contend with fairway traps, thick timber, and an out of bounds.

13
Par 4, Length 323m

Another potential birdie opportunity, but again the tee shot should be well placed. Any shot hit to the right will leave a more difficult approach over bunkers to the small green.

14
Par 5, Length 515m

The longest hole, where birdies will be scarce. Bunkers 45 metres short of the green leave little opening for long hitters attempt to get close in two. An out of bounds left and behind the green provides an additional mental hazard.

15
Par 3, Length 141m

This hole is considered by many to be one of the best par three's in Australia. The very narrow green is protected by deep bunkers on both sides and slopes sharply from back to front.

16
Par 4, Length 397m

The first of a trio of great finishing par four's. This hole doglegs right with a large number of bunkers perfectly placed to deter or challenge long hitters. The extremely fast, sloping green requires a delicate putting touch.

17
Par 4, Length 420m

An extremely difficult par four, particularly if the wind is blowing from the north. Any shot hooked to the left is 'dead', and the huge, sloping putting surface will produce many three-putts.

18
Par 4, Length 391m

An accurate long iron approach is required to set up a par on this hole. The green is guarded by traps on both sides and like the previous 17, has many rolls and borrows.

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The Metropolitan Golf Club

Golf Road
Oakleigh South, VIC, 3167
Australia

Region: Melbourne Sandbelt

The Metropolitan Golf Club

The Metropolitan Golf Club is one of Australia's premier golf courses. Tucked quietly in Melbourne's south eastern suburbs it is one of the renowned "sandbelt courses" and widely recognised as one of the finest golf courses in Australia. It has also been described as the Australian equivalent of Augusta National. The perfect fairways, marbletop greens and blindingly white bunkers all combine to offer a test of golf not seen previously in Australia. Metropolitan is a tough but fair test of golf.

The Metropolitan Golf Club is one of Australia's premier golf courses. Tucked quietly in Melbourne's south eastern suburbs it is one of the renowned "sandbelt courses" and widely recognised as one of the finest golf courses in Australia.

The course has continually challenged the best players in the world. Peter Thomson began his brilliant career with a win here in the 1951 Australian Open. Jack Newton won the Australian Open in 1979 by one shot from a young Greg Norman, who three putted the final green.

In 1993 Brad Faxon mastered Metropolitan with a four round score of 275, 13 under par, including equaling Greg Norman's course record 65.

In 1997 Lee Westwood won a very exciting Australian Open defeating Greg Norman in a sudden death playoff on the 18th hole.

In 2001 the course hosted the World Matchplay Championships-a tournament which saw the world's top golfers gather at Metropolitan for a unique matchplay event where the unlikely winner Steve Stricker walked away with a cool $1 million pay cheque.

Most recently the course hosted the 2009 Women’s Australian Open with former world number one Laura Davies prevailing in a very exciting finish.

Metropolitan Golf Club can also be described as the Australian equivalent of Augusta National. The perfect fairways, marbletop greens and blindingly white bunkers all combine to offer a test of golf not seen previously in Australia. Metropolitan is a tough but fair test of golf.

Course Information

Par: 72
ACR: 74
Length (m): 6427
Architect: J.B. Mackenzie (1906), Dick Wilson (1959)
Design Year: 1906
Top 100: 13

Playing Tips

1
Par 4, Length 372m

The tee shot should be played right of the fairway bunker on the left. The second shot to an open green requires a long iron or fairway wood.

2
Par 3, Length 143m

One of the most picturesque holes on the course. The hole is heavily bunkered and the green moderately contoured. Anything not landing on the green will bring about a tough second shot.

3
Par 4, Length 368m

A two-tiered green sloping from left to right requires a tee shot to be played into the right hand side of the fairway. Such positioning opens up the second shot to the green. However, the greenside bunkers on the left is one to stay away from.

4
Par 5, Length 444m

A fairway bunker jutting out from the right side of the fairway requires a tee shot down the left. The second shot should be played short of the bunkers, allowing a pitch to a slightly elevated green. This hole favours the long hitters.

5
Par 4, Length 340m

Another hole made more difficult by the addition of a new championship tee. Two deep fairway bunkers are right in play down the left side of the driving area, the right hand fairway bunker is of little concern. The green features a huge slope off the shoulder of the right hand greenside bunker and if the flag is in the right half of the green an approach from the left half of the fairway - usually with a short or mid iron - is ideal. Widely regarded as one of the classic holes on the course.

6
Par 5, Length 457m

The 6th is the second of three front nine par fives and the player must drive to the far left side of the dogleg if an approach over the huge gum trees that block both the shot and view down to the green is to be avoided. Jack Nicklaus, famously, carried the fairway bunker that stretches across the left half of the fairway (270 metres) with a driver and a small ball in the 1967 Australian P.G.A Championship. The green and surrounds have been redesigned, the new cavernous bunkers and heavily contoured green require skilled shotmaking whether from a long second or short third shot.

7
Par 3, Length 180m

The longest par three on the course is characterized by a generous green sloping from the top right to the bottom left from the tee. A long iron or wood is required.

8
Par 5, Length 460m

A big fairway bunker has to be negotiated with the drive. The second shot should be placed on the right side of the fairway, which makes the approach considerably easier as the green slopes from left to right.

9
Par 4, Length 386m

A perfect hole to drag out that tired old story of "when I was your age I could drive it across those trees". In 1968 Nicklaus flew it over the corner trees on this sharp dogleg right with a three wood and hit a wedge to the green for four straight days but "the trees were only so high when I was your age". They have grown up so tall now it's impossible to pull that shot off. Most play down to the corner with a long iron or a three wood and if the driver comes out it has to be perfectly faded around the corner or it runs through the fairway. The second shot can vary between a four iron down to an eight or nine. This is the most beautifully contoured and shaped green on the golf course - being on in two is no guarantee of a par.

10
Par 4, Length 396m

A long dogleg left plays all of its length. The hole requires two good shots to reach the large green in two.

11
Par 3, Length 140m

A testing par three. The green slopes diagonally as you look at it from the tee-box. The tee shot should be directed towards the left part of the green. Play conservatively.

12
Par 4, Length 351m

Off the tee, the ideal position is the centre right part of the fairway to avoid sand traps on the left. The second shot should be played to the right side of the green, taking the front bunkers out of play.

13
Par 3, Length 131m

Playing to a large, well bunkered green, a shot to the middle of the putting surface is desirable. if you miss the green, be prepared for a tough up and down.

14
Par 5, Length 495m

A dogleg left as well as fairway bunkers on that side demand a shot to the right of the fairway off the tee. From there the second shot should be played to within pitching distance of the green with a chance for birdie. This hole favours the long hitters.

15
Par 4, Length 410m

This is probably the most difficult of Metropolitan's par fours and again the strategy is simple and clear. A long bunker with a high lip sits into the left side of the fairway and a green that angles from its front left corner to the back right clearly favours an approach from close to the fairway bunker. A greenside bunker closes off the flag for those approaching from the right and only a big high fade will get the job done for those who fly their drives too far to the right.

16
Par 4, Length 314m

This short par four doglegs sharply right around several deep fairway bunkers that have proved pivotal in deciding at least two Australian Opens. Bob Shearer in 1979 and Ian Baker-Finch in 1986 both drove into the bunkers and made killer bogeys that cost them their chance in those tournaments. Some can drive far enough to reach the green but it's almost impossible to keep such a long shot on the small sloping green. Often the pin placement dictates the best place to play to from the tee with the most difficult pin to get close to being behind the front right bunker, when the flag is there it's often easier to approach from 70 metres than it is from 30. A wonderful example of how great a well designed short par four can be.

17
Par 4, Length 374m

A single deep bunker that is almost impossible to hit the green from, sits in the left side of the driving area. It's the one place not to go. Some curiously sited trees (but favorites of the members) 60 metres short of the green make for a blind second for those who have driven to the right, although that is the only effect they have in the play of the hole. The green is relatively large, not in truth that difficult to hit and only when the pin is tucked close to the bunkers do they have much influence on the approach.

18
Par 4, Length 383m

The championship tee added for the 1997 Australian Open stretched this hole out to 433 metres and into a wind from the north it's a brutally difficult hole. The hole is actually dead straight and it is the blocked drive that is caught by the fairway bunkers down the right, but when the flag is on the left of the green it's clearly best to approach from close to the bunkers. In the 1979 Australian Open, Greg Norman hit two terrific shots, the second with a five iron, just under the tier of the two level green and then three putted to lose by one to Jack Newton. Eighteen years later in 1997, from almost exactly the same spot, Norman three putted in the playoff with Lee Westwood to lose the Open again.

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The Royal Melbourne Golf Club (West Course)

Cheltenham Road
Black Rock, VIC, 3193
Australia

Region: Melbourne Sandbelt

The Royal Melbourne Golf Club (West Course)

The Royal Melbourne Golf Club is a 36 hole private members club located in the heart of the world famous Melbourne Sandbelt golf region. The West Course is regularly rated as the number one rated golf course in Australia (and was recently ranked number 6 in the world) and was designed by world renowned golf course architect Dr Alistair MacKenzie. The natural peaks and troughs in the terrain have been used to maximum benefit with strategically designed and memorable holes throughout.

The Royal Melbourne Golf Club is continually rated as the number 1 golf course in Australia and has been as high as number 5 in the world. It is the most recognised golf course on the world famous Melbourne Sandbelt.

There are a number of key features of Royal Melbourne - tea tree scrub lining the fairways and catching any errant shots, cavernous bunkers surrounding most greens and also placed strategically on most fairways to catch a slightly wayward drive and lightning fast greens that give up their fair share of 3 putts.The golf club boasts 36 holes comprising of the East and West courses. The 18 hole composite course comprises 6 holes from the East Course and 12 holes from the West Course all contained within the one boundary.

The West Course forms the majority of holes contained within the main boundaries of the golf course aside from 4 holes (13 to 16) which are played across the road in an adjoining property. The par 5 holes are not long and all are reachable in two for the longer hitters. The difficulty of these holes is not so much in the length of the holes but rather the harsh penalties which exists for a less than perfectly struck shot.

The style of the holes is similar and MacKenzie has used the peaks and troughs in the slope of the land to maximum benefit. The course is not hilly by any stretch of the imagination however additional challenges are created on selected uphill approach shots. Both courses at Royal Melbourne consists of the full gamut of golf holes - strategic short par 4 holes measuring less than 300 metres (similar to another MacKenzie masterpiece - Cypress Point), classic par 3 holes with undulating putting surfaces, surrounding bunkers and local wind and reachable par 5 holes which reward precise shotmaking.

Course Information

Par: 72
ACR: 72
Length (m): 6030
Architect: Alister MacKenzie
Design Year: 1931
Top 100: 1

Playing Tips

1
Par 4, Length 392m

A good open driving hole, this presents a wide area leading up to a big green with little danger. But it's a deceptive hole, with a hooked tee shot leading to danger in unplayable trees on the left. A deep trap on the right of the green, plus a grassy mound and deep rough on the left, makes it a little deceptive. A hard par four and not a lot of birdies.

2
Par 5, Length 439m

A fast sloping green stands between a par and a possible eagle as this hole can be reached in two. There's plenty of room for the drive and a long iron can put big hitters on the green if they carry the bunkers guarding the entrance to the hole. Hitting too far left will find some thick ti-tree or maybe heavy rough - or the deep bunker.

3
Par 4, Length 324m

This is a real birdie chance, with a good drive able to set up a comfortable approach pitch. But beware - the green slopes down over the back and it's easy to finish well past the pin. Bunkers on the left are dangerous, but it's an open approach.

4
Par 5, Length 430m

A tough hole that is a good par if achieved. The drive goes over a hill, with fairway bunkers looming for the short shot. A wood or long iron approach must be straight, as bunkers on either side of the green are trouble.

5
Par 3, Length 161m

Accuracy and the right choice of club makes this a superb par three hole. A middle iron is needed to cross a valley to the green, heavily fortified with bunkers. The fast green has a steep slope from front to back and is a tricky test.

6
Par 4, Length 391m

Rated as the most difficult green on the course, the early shots are crucial. A sharp dog leg makes it vital that the tee shot carries a minimum of 200-metres across dense rough and fairway traps, in order to leave the ball in the right position. The elevated green slopes towards the front and produces many three putts.

7
Par 3, Length 135m

A deceptively easy-looking hole where club selection is vital. The tee shot must be well-placed, with the narrow green and difficult undulations making long putts tough. It goes uphill from the tee, with plenty of bunkers, especially for those who over-shoot the green.

8
Par 4, Length 346m

The 8th Hole is a deceptive Par 4 that requires a well judged second shot, to a flat green, that slopes towards the back bunkers.

9
Par 4, Length 380m

The 9th Hole is a testing Par 4, uphill to the green, well bunkered on both sides.

10
Par 4, Length 279m

A tempting hole for the big hitters, especially if they attack the pin by cutting the corner. But that's where the danger is, as the sand bunker is huge and a miss can be penalised. It's short, but suits the disciplined players who go the right way around. But watch the long drivers tackle that corner!

11
Par 4, Length 416m

A deceptive hole that tempts the big hitters who challenge the fairway trap and rough on the left as they go direct. A second shot to a sloping green is a long haul and must be accurate, with bunkers guarding the entrance. A drive and a four iron can still produce many bogies.

12
Par 5, Length 435m

A lengthy fairway which requires a couple of long shots, especially off the tee where some early bunkers await the strong hitters. This modified par four becomes difficult into the northerly wind.

13
Par 3, Length 134m

The 13th Hole is a challenging short Par 3, with a pitched green making it difficult to get close to the pin.

14
Par 4, Length 335m

The 14th Hole is a very good Par 4 with the green sloping right to left, making it hard to get close to the pin.

15
Par 5, Length 427m

The 15th Hole is a short but tricky Par 5 which can be reached with an iron. The green slopes sharply to the front.

16
Par 3, Length 202m

An extremely tough Par 3 noted for its extensive bunkers and small green. Woods are often required from the tee, however don't overplay, lay up short to find an easier approach.

17
Par 4, Length 401m

Again two long shots are required, with the drive passing some bunkers on the left-hand side of the fairway. It's a tight driving hole and the second shot to a modified green needs a mid to short iron depending on the wind. Dangerous traps on the right make for a straight approach.

18
Par 4, Length 396m

This is a pleasant-looking hole, but full of danger. A dog-leg to the right means the drive must carry upwards and over 200-metres to present an approach shot from a downhill lie. The green looks awesome, well-protected by bunkers, but a good eight iron lobbed nicely will pay dividends.

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The Dunes Golf Links

Browns Road
Rye, VIC, 3941
Australia

Region: Mornington Peninsula

The Dunes Golf Links

The Dunes Golf Links is in a links style and many of the holes could be plucked straight from Scotland or Ireland. The Dunes is one of very few links style courses in Australia. All the holes are played through and over rolling sand dunes on what is known as the "Cups Country" of the Mornington Peninsula. The championship course features a number of different styles of holes, some with elevated tees hitting down to wide fairways, a number which are generally flat with subtle undulations and some great par 3s where bunkering, wind and large, uneven putting surfaces are the norm.

The Dunes Golf Links is a great links style course on the Mornington Peninsula and many of the holes could be plucked straight from Scotland or Ireland. The Dunes is one of very few links style courses in Australia. All the holes are played through and over rolling sand dunes on what is known as the "Cups Country" of the Mornington Peninsula.

The Mornington Peninsula is fast becoming Australia's answer to the Monterey Peninsula of California or South Carolina also in the USA. The large number of courses in the region make it a real golfing getaway.

The 18 holes Dunes Championship course is a tough test for all standards of golfer, especially when subjected to the elements (which is generally the case). The Cups 9 hole course is a more relaxed par 33 layout designed to attract the casual golfer.

The championship course features a number of different styles of holes, some with elevated tees hitting down to wide fairways, a number which are generally flat with subtle undulations and some great par 3s where bunkering, wind and large, uneven putting surfaces are the norm. Wind is a real factor at The Dunes and slightly errant shots are exaggerated by the wind's presence, leaving a more difficult approach, or in many cases, a chip out of complete trouble. 

Course Information

Par: 72
ACR: 72
Length (m): 6409
Architect: Tony Cashmore
Design Year: 1997
Top 100: 19

Playing Tips

1
Par 4, Length 409m

This hole is a mid length par 4 whereby keeping a line left of the distant cypress trees, you can cut the corner off the fairway.

2
Par 4, Length 365m

The second shot on this hole is at least one more club than the yardage would suggest, and into the wind possibly two or three more clubs.

3
Par 3, Length 135m

Play this shot straight at the pin, don't go left and right.

4
Par 4, Length 310m

This short par 4 has plenty of room to the left with the drive, however a drive played left will leave a difficult second shot. The best line is straight over the bunkers.

5
Par 5, Length 473m

Don't let the dune put you off on this par 5. The carry is only 140 metres from the back tee to a big wide valley. The best line is directly over the white stone.

6
Par 3, Length 193m

This par 3 has a large green and down wind plays a short 200 metres. The best line for this hole is down the left edge.

7
Par 5, Length 477m

This is the last of the blind drive holes. Drive over the hill into the huge valley which leaves a big bail out area for the second shot to the right. Playing this line however will leave you with a tough pitch.

8
Par 4, Length 392m

Off the tee hit as far as possible.

9
Par 4, Length 376m

This part 4 has a big dogleg to the left, so aim just to the right of the fairway bunkers.

10
Par 4, Length 340m

A long drive over the bunker will leave you with a beautiful second shot.

11
Par 4, Length 300m

On this short par 4, the bunkers on the dune can be carried if the wind direction is right.

12
Par 5, Length 502m

This par 5 is the longest hole on the course with a tough dog leg to the right. A long drive down the centre will open up the hidden green through the wasteland.

13
Par 3, Length 160m

This hole plays long into the wind with more room at the back left section of the green than what appears.

14
Par 4, Length 354m

Watch out for the second shot as it is longer than what the yardage would suggest on this par 4.

15
Par 5, Length 392m

Off the tee, keep left of the "six pack" fairway bunkers and carefully place your second shot. Also make special note of the reverse tier on the green.

16
Par 4, Length 419m

For this par 4, a drive left of centre will ensure a shorter and safer shot.

17
Par 3, Length 179m

A beautiful looking par 3 hole however if you intend missing the green (which none of us do!) miss it right.

18
Par 4, Length 409m

Aim just left of the slot in the dunes, and this will bring you to rest in a beautiful wide valley.

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The National Golf Club (Old Course)

Cups Drive
Cape Schanck, VIC, 3939
Australia

Region: Mornington Peninsula

The National Golf Club (Old Course)

The National Golf Club is a private members golf club and Australia's first to offer access to 72 holes of first class quality golf offering incredible variety and endless challenges. All four courses are regularly included in the listings of Australia's Top 100 courses. Your golf on the Old Course will be punctuated with spectacular views of the coastline, abundant challenge and great variety from the premier Robert Trent-Jones Jnr course in Australia.

The National Golf Club is a 54 hole private members' golf club, providing three distinct golfing challenges (Old Course, Moonah Course and Ocean Course). The three courses have been designed by 3 of the world's leading golf architects - Greg Norman, Robert Trent Jones Jr and Peter Thomson. As such the 3 courses, although located very closely to one another, offer the golfer a range of golfing experiences.

The original National course (Old Course) was open for play in 1988 and was designed by leading golf course architect Robert Trent Jones Jnr. Trent Jones Jnr recently visited The National to look back on his creation and how it has improved over time. Take a look at a video posted after his recent visit.

This course is a generally hilly course combining amazing coastal views, challenging ball carries and slick, undulating putting surfaces into a test of golf not previously seen in Australia.

A number of holes provide spectacular views with the standout hole in terms of beauty being the 7th hole. A par 3 of 135 metres, it plays over a cavernous ravine to a large green which runs from left to right. The backdrop to this hole is the coastline of the Mornington Peninsula heading down to Portsea. There is really only 1 place to hit the ball...on the green.

The course comprises a number of holes with ocean views, a number of "inland holes" and all are framed by the natural tee tree and Moonah trees which are common on this part of the Mornington Peninsula. When you play at The National you generally want to hit the ball straight as errant shots are severely punished.

The Old course at The National is a very enjoyable test of golf....if you are hitting the ball straight, if the wind is not blowing and if you are putting well! The National, located on the Mornington Peninsula approximately 80 minutes from the city of Melbourne, is a must play for any keen golfer. All three courses are ranked in Australia's top 40.

Course Information

Par: 72
ACR: 74
Length (m): 6313
Architect: Robert Trent Jones Jnr
Design Year: 1988
Top 100: 15

Playing Tips

1
Par 4, Length 342m

A simple tee shot to a wide fairway guarded by a bunker left, where the sole hidden problem is a hollow short left of the green reached only by long hitters. The prominent moonah tree provides a good driving line since second shots from the right side of the fairway have a greater chance of settling on the green.

2
Par 4, Length 420m

A strong straight away hole that bottlenecks at the ideal drive length where contouring causes balls to feed to the middle. Fairway bunkering right and a cavernous bunker at the front left of the green provide definition and should be avoided. Many conservative players elect to lay up short of this bunker with their second shot as it requires great accuracy to reach the front right entrance to the green. Alternatively, the ball must be hit with enough elevation to hold the firm green.

3
Par 4, Length 390m

The drive over a deep valley is played to a fairway sloping upward to a semi blind green. The second shot is played to a large green, where the surrounds at the right will see shots bounce toward the centre of the two terraced green. Shots to the top terrace should be played with plenty of club as the terrace is severe.

4
Par 3, Length 165m

A visually exciting shot over a lateral hazard from tees which are very elevated. Judgment of distance is the challenge, particularly on windy days. The large green has a spine, running from opposite the centre of the left bunker into the middle of the green, which influences most putts.

5
Par 5, Length 475m

The drive on this dog leg left par 5 advantages the player who hits the ball right to left. The second shot is played slightly uphill. The green is divided by a spine with a sloping left section and a flatter right section. When playing approach shots to the left section, an "extra club" is advised.

6
Par 4, Length 344m

The fairway is generous in width until it bottlenecks beyond the corner of the dog leg. Shots to the front terrace of the green should be aimed well left. Shots hit to the rear of the two terrace green will often feed back onto the top terrace.

7
Par 3, Length 139m

The magnificent coastline views makes this The National?s signature hole. Club selection is critical as whilst the huge green is particularly wide, anything hit short, long or left of the green is best forgotten. The deep bunker at the rear should also be avoided.

8
Par 5, Length 473m

The fairway which is obscured from the elevated tee is of comfortable width with a helpful downslope. The second shot is played over rough to an elevated green or to either of two fairway sections, depending on power level.

9
Par 4, Length 403m

Tee shots directed centre left are favoured. The choice of club for the second shot to a significantly contoured green will be influenced by prevailing wind conditions. When the hole is cut at the back left, an extra club will be needed.

10
Par 5, Length 521m

A dog leg left followed by a twist to the right. From the tee a choice is offered to play safely to the right of two large fairway bunkers to a wide fairway or to take on the bunkers and possibly arrive on or close to the green in two. The huge green is shared with the 9th.

11
Par 4, Length 371m

The blind tee is played over a rise to a wide fairway. Long drivers will take advantage of the downslope to set up a pitch to the green. Others will be left with a difficult second shot from a downhill lie. A shot to the middle of the green avoids the bunkers which attract short approach shots.

12
Par 4, Length 308m

Big hitters may attempt to drive on or close to the green over the corner of a slight dog leg, whilst others may choose the safer option of an iron or 3 wood to the wider left side fairway. This hole presents a great birdie opportunity since it can be easily reached with a short iron second shot. Although, beware of a severe fall-away to the rear.

13
Par 3, Length 198m

This long par 3 is normally played into the prevailing breeze. Par can often be saved from bunkers both sides but the task is made more difficult when the pin is back.

14
Par 4, Length 390m

The powerful golfer has the option of driving the fairway bunkers and setting up an easy pitch to the green. The less adventurous will drive to a wide fairway to the right. In this instance, the second shot must be accurate to avoid the pine trees and bunkers, which surround the green.

15
Par 4, Length 358m

Drives short of the dog leg corner leave blind second shots to a green with two definite terraces. Bunkers at the end of the fairway and one past the tree-lined right side catch big hitters in favourable conditions.

16
Par 3, Length 168m

The tee shot is played through a deep valley to a relatively flat green against a backdrop of exquisite beauty. Shots hit back right, and those hit to the left side and which avoid the bunkers, usually find the green from contoured banks.

17
Par 5, Length 511m

A par 5 with spectacular ocean views. Big hitters may drive across the dog leg from the elevated tee setting up a possible second shot to the green. A more conventional approach avoids the left fairway bunkers from the tee, with a second shot played short of further fairway bunkers within pitching distance of the green.

18
Par 4, Length 337m

A dog leg with the tee and fairway protected by significant ridges on both sides. It is often sound strategy to play short of the visible fairway bunker, since reaching the green in two is rare from this hazard.

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Kauri Cliffs

Matauri Bay Rd
Matauri Bay, NZNORTH
New Zealand

Region: Northland

Kauri Cliffs

Kauri Cliffs is one of those surreal golf experiences that avid golfers should experience at least once in their lifetime. Fifteen holes view the Pacific Ocean, six of which are played alongside cliffs which plunge to the sea. The beautiful inland holes wind through marsh, forest and farmland.

Kauri Cliffs is one of those surreal golf experiences that avid golfers should experience at least once in their lifetime. From the moment you drive into the property and head down towards the onsite accommodation at The Lodge at Kauri Cliffs you feel as though you are the only person on the planet.

Kauri Cliffs is located four and a half hours north of Auckland in the Bay of Islands region and its absolute ocean frontage ensures uninterrupted views on many of the golf holes as well as from the Lodge itself.

In fact fifteen holes view the Pacific Ocean, six of which are played alongside cliffs, which plunge into the sea. These spectacular views can help to ease the pain of a bad golf round and you should arm yourself with a camera as countless opportunities arise for memorable photos during the round.

So what about the golf course itself? Well aside from the fifteen Pacific Ocean holes there are 3 beautiful inland holes which wind their way through marsh, forest, and farmland. The eighteen holes combine to form an interesting, enjoyable and sometimes challenging test of golf. The four sets of tees allow the golfer to choose how much fun they would like to have during the round. Kauri Cliffs is a very playable golf course which can be enjoyed by all standard of golfers.

Kauri Cliffs was also awarded Best New International Golf Course 2001 by Golf Digest and recently selected 58th Best Golf Course in the World by the accepted authority, US Golf Magazine.

Course Information

Par: 72
ACR: 74
Length (m): 6510
Architect: David Harman
Design Year: 2000

Playing Tips

1
Par 4, Length 402m

A straight away par 4. A tee shot left centre of fairway gives the best approach into the green. Be aware of the bunker and sever drop off on the left side of the green.

2
Par 4, Length 403m

The rough on the left angles sharply inward. A good drive should be hit just inside the bunkers on the right. Be cautious of the severe drop-offs to the left and back of the green.

3
Par 4, Length 326m

A great "little" golf hole with a wide open fairway. The challenge on this hole is the short second shot to a well guarded, undulating green.

4
Par 5, Length 510m

One of the great par 5's in golf. Aim tee shot inside left hand bunkers. Longer hitters will have the option of going for the green in two. Laying up, be aware of the narrowing landing area and hazard on the right.

5
Par 3, Length 183m

Less adventurous golfers should aim at the small fairway on the left hand side of the green. Consider an extra club, as you cannot afford to be short.

6
Par 4, Length 370m

A tee shot aimed to the left centre of the fairway leaves the best approach to the green. The green is elevated and very deep; so take this into consideration when selecting a club.

7
Par 3, Length 201m

Club selection is crucial on this demanding par 3. Don't let the views distract you.

8
Par 5, Length 493m

Aim your tee shot to the left centre of the fairway. A very long, narrow green greets you, fiercely protected by bunkers on the left.

9
Par 4, Length 353m

A severely uphill par 4 completes the front nine. Don't let the gully "bully" you, for a good tee-shot will easily carry. The tendency is to under club the second shot. This is a deep green where an extra club won't hurt.

10
Par 4, Length 333m

Aim tee-shot right centre of the fairway. Be aware of the hazard on the left of the fairway, which wraps around the back edge of the green.

11
Par 4, Length 385m

Aim tee-shot right centre of sloping fairway. A precise approach shot is necessary to this well guarded "island like" green. Shorter hitters should lay up short of the marsh.

12
Par 3, Length 192m

Anything short or left spells trouble on this wide, shallow, two tiered green.

13
Par 4, Length 390m

Aim your tee-shot right of the Totara trees in the far distance. This landing area will provide you with a good look at the well bunkered green.

14
Par 3, Length 211m

This long downhill par 3 overlooks the Cavalli Islands. The green is protected by deep bunkers on the right and a severe drop off on the left.

15
Par 5, Length 498m

The cliffs on the left and narrow fairway demand an accurate tee-shot. Longer hitters can reach this green in two.

16
Par 4, Length 335m

A tee-shot on the right hand side of the fairway leaves a short downhill approach. Very long hitters may risk the hazards and drive the green.

17
Par 4, Length 432m

On the tee, don't bite off more than you can chew. The large deep green will readily receive a long iron or wood.

18
Par 5, Length 493m

Drives to the left spell trouble here. Continue to favour the right side of the fairway but be mindful of the bunker 110 meters out.

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The New South Wales Golf Club

1528 Anzac Parade (Botany Bay National Park)
La Perouse, NSW, 2036
Australia

Region: Sydney

The New South Wales Golf Club

The NSW Golf Club is rated in the top 50 golf courses in the world. In fact, it is the only Sydney Course rated in the top 100 best golf courses listing. The character of the course is unique, a links style course set amongst the hills and valleys that hug the rugged Pacific Ocean coastline boasting magnificent ocean views as backdrop.

Regarded as one of the top golf courses in Australia and currently rated number 34 in the world, NSW is a wonderful combination of undulating fairways, beautiful scenic vistas and a recently refurbished clubhouse which is a magnificent combination of traditional architecture and five star comfort.

The NSW golf course is a links style championship course spectacularly located on the Pacific Ocean and on historic Botany Bay. Even when there is a gentle breeze prevailing the course will test the above average player with its tight fairways and testing greens.

When the wind blows it gets tough! Should you lose a ball in the rough then don't bother looking - just drop another ball and take your penalty.

This golf course and club are steeped in history. It is a well known historical fact that Captain Cook and his crew found their first drinking water in a natural spring below where the18th tee is located today.

In short, this is more than just a golf course - it is an unforgettable golf and natural experience. To play golf at NSW Golf Club is to play golf how the game was intended to be played - at the complete mercy of Mother Nature and the golfer's ability.

NSW Golf Club has also been compared to Pebble Beach. The golf course has definitely more and better ocean views than Pebble Beach. To play at NSW Golf Club is a " must " for all discerning purist golfers.

Course Information

Par: 72
ACR: 74
Length (m): 6227
Architect: Alister Mackenzie (1928), Eric Apperly (1932 and 51)
Design Year: 1928
Top 100: 5

Playing Tips

1
Par 4, Length 293m

An easy drive and pitch par 4. The green is new and quite undulating. On the drive beware the bunkers to the right.

2
Par 3, Length 184m

A testing par 3 from the back tees. If you miss the green it is better to do so short than long. As a general rule this applies to all holes at New South Wales.

3
Par 4, Length 380m

A hidden dogleg which starts with a blind tee shot through a chute between the tee tree. Depending on how much of the dog leg is cut off you can have anything from a 4 iron to a wedge into this elevated green. Very steep drop over the green. Par a good score.

4
Par 4, Length 391m

Off the tee aim for the large hump to the right hand side of the fairway. The approach shot needs to cross a ridge to reach the hourglass-shaped green guarded by a bunker and 2 grassy hollows.

5
Par 5, Length 468m

A blind hole. Aim for the ridge 230 metres away from the tee. There is not much fairway left to land the second shot, so accuracy is the key here. The green slopes to the back with 2 sandtraps left and front right.

6
Par 3, Length 185m

A classic par 3. Depending on the wind, it can be anything from a long iron to a wedge. If still, take one more club as it is slightly uphill and the green slopes towards you and the sea.

7
Par 4, Length 376m

A straightaway uphill par four, but the shot is very demanding with Tea tree either side of the fairway capable of severely punishing any stray shots. Depending on the wind for the long hitters, it might be just a wedge or a nine iron with a southerly, but into a nor-easter it's a longish iron or even a wood. A very steep and difficult green and many a four-putt has been made during tournaments.

8
Par 5, Length 505m

Your line is over the dip in the hill in the distance. If your second shot clears this dip then it is a pitch to a well bunkered green. Ideally, your second shot should be slightly left of the dip as this improves the angle of approach.

9
Par 4, Length 340m

The driving line is further to the right than you might think. There is a clump of bushes (2 or 3 feet high) about 70 metres from the back tees. Go straight over that small clump and you will be set up in the middle of the fairway to attack the pin.

10
Par 4, Length 359m

A mid length par 4 with a fairly tight driving area followed by a medium length approach to a long green. Take note of where the pin is as the club selection will vary. Beware the bunkers on the right of the green!

11
Par 3, Length 149m

Another scenic par 3 which looks over the whole course. Wind is a big factor here and generally you are playing into the wind so take enough club.

12
Par 5, Length 482m

A hittable par 5. The landing area on the drive is wide. The longer hitters will be able to hit these green in two. But beware of the bunkers, they are deceptively difficult.

13
Par 4, Length 375m

A dog leg left par 4. After a well hit drive (depending on the wind) a mid to short iron is all which is left to a green which slopes back to front. Again below the hole is the preferred option.

14
Par 4, Length 323m

A wonderful par 4. Not too long but very spectacular. Long hitters can chew off a fair amount of the dog leg and be left with a short approach to a green perched high on top of a hill. Do not be long on your approach!

15
Par 4, Length 372m

A famous difficult par four which is ranked as the hardest hole on the course's stroke index. An uphill tee shot through a narrow chute needs to go about 220m to reach the top of the hill and so offer a view of the green. The tee shot is extremely difficult into a wind, but once you reach the corner there is little trouble near the green.

16
Par 4, Length 403m

A tough par 4 which dog legs left at about the 260m mark. Aim further right with your drive or else your second shot may need to be hit over trees. The approach requires more club than you may think.

17
Par 3, Length 153m

A deceptive par 3. The wind is a key factor here and although it may seem calm on the tee special notice should be taken of the flagstick and how the wind may be affecting it. Do not miss the green to the right as a very daunting approach awaits.

18
Par 5, Length 507m

Avoid trees to the right and further away on the left. From here a wood will carry the hollow on the right some 130 metres away from the green.

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Suggested Accommodation

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Matthew Ridge, Golf Travel Manager, GOLFSelect

Matthew Ridge Golf Travel Manager

Richard Morgan, Golf Travel Specialist, GOLFSelect

Richard Morgan Golf Travel Specialist

Gary Lisbon, Managing Director and Owner, GOLFSelect

Gary Lisbon Managing Director and Owner

Door of Hope

Door of Hope Australia Inc.

GOLFSelect is strongly committed to assisting children who are not as fortunate as our own. We enjoy a very strong association with Door of Hope Australia Inc. This child-focused, non government organisation was established to help alleviate the suffering caused by poverty in developing nations. Their vision is that children in every nation will have access to education, clean water, nutrition, medical care, and protection from war, abuse and exploitation. As part of our association, a donation is provided to Door of Hope for every holiday that we organise on behalf of you, our client. We thank you for supporting this initiative and helping to make an important difference to those who do not always have a voice.