Overview

At a Glance

  • When

    December 9-15, 2019

  • Package

    Various packages with guaranteed access will be available

  • Accommodation

    Various Melbourne city properties will be available

  • Drive

    Daily transfers from city properties will be included

  • Tournament

    Tickets to attend The President's Cup in December 2019

    Captains’ Club tickets for each of the days will include first-class amenities for the fans including retail food and beverage for purchase, premium cash bar, big screen televisions, private restrooms, scoring terminals and non-reserved tables in a sports bar setting.

  • Golf

    Single Day Golf Options

    GOLFSelect can include unrivalled access to a range of private member courses (as listed below)

  • Other

    GOLFSelect, a licensed travel operator for the 2019 Presidents Cup PC19AUNZ-1070

    GOLFSelect is an independent contractor to, and is not an agent or associate of Event Travel Office

    Ticket Terms and Conditions apply to all tickets and attendance at the Presidents Cup 2019. These Conditions are available from GOLFSelect on request or by clicking here

The 2019 Presidents Cup returns to The Royal Melbourne Golf Club in December 2019. Now is your chance to attend this exciting event and witness firsthand the best 12 players from the United States take on an International team made up of the best players from the rest of world, excluding Europe.

GOLFSelect have been appointed as an official Licensed Travel Operator for the 2019 Presidents Cup and can assist with guaranteed ticket and accommodation packages

To assist in fulfilling your needs please take a moment to answer our short questionnaire (will take less than 2 minutes) and we will be in contact with you to further progress your enquiry. Alternatively contact our 2019 Presidents Cup Hotline on +61-3-9563-6776 and we would be delighted to assist.

Single Day Golf Options 

Melbourne, Victoria is blessed with a large number of world class Championship golf courses located within a short drive of the city centre and Royal Melbourne Golf Club.

GOLFSelect have secured access to a number of courses within the famous Melbourne Sandbelt with timings fitting in perfectly with the playing of the 2019 Presidents Cup.

Golf options available are:

Kingston Heath Golf Club

  • rated number 2 course in Australia
  • Mon 16 Dec 2019 - 7:45am shotgun
  • AUD$495 per person inc golf/breakfast/lunch/transfers

Metropolitan Golf Club

  • rated number 13 course in Australia
  • Thu 12 Dec 2019 - 7:00am
  • $395 pp Aust/NZ residents, $495 pp Other inc golf/breakfast/transfers

Yarra Yarra Golf Club

  • rated top 50 course in Australia
  • Wed 11 Dec 2019 - 12:30pm
  • $380 per person inc golf/breakfast/lunch/transfers

Spring Valley Golf Club

  • rated top 50 course in Australia
  • Mon 16 Dec 2019 - 7:30am
  • $285 pp inc golf/breakfast/lunch/transfers

To enquire about these golf options and to lock in a golf travel package to the 2019 Presidents Cup please contact us by email or by phone on our 2019 Presidents Cup Hotline on +61-3-9563-6776.

Itinerary Day-by-Day

Monday, 9 December 2019
Notes Arrive in Melbourne ready for Presidents Cup
Tuesday, 10 December 2019
Notes Team Practice Rounds - All day
Golf
Royal Melbourne Golf Club (Presidents Cup Course) (Guaranteed tickets to attend) 
The Presidents Cup course at Royal Melbourne comprises a combination of 12 holes from the clubs West course and 6 holes from the East course all contained within the confines of the home paddock. The slight routing variation of this course which sees the 16th hole pass by the clubhouse is reflective of where matchplay matches on average finish. A new addition to the layout is the inclusion of the 16th hole of the East course which until now has not been included in the traditional composite course layout.
Wednesday, 11 December 2019
Notes Practice Rounds - (AM)
Golf
Royal Melbourne Golf Club (Presidents Cup Course) (Guaranteed tickets to attend) 
The Presidents Cup course at Royal Melbourne comprises a combination of 12 holes from the clubs West course and 6 holes from the East course all contained within the confines of the home paddock. The slight routing variation of this course which sees the 16th hole pass by the clubhouse is reflective of where matchplay matches on average finish. A new addition to the layout is the inclusion of the 16th hole of the East course which until now has not been included in the traditional composite course layout.
Thursday, 12 December 2019
Notes 5 Foursomes matches or 5 Four-ball matches
Golf
Royal Melbourne Golf Club (Presidents Cup Course) (Guaranteed tickets to attend) 
The Presidents Cup course at Royal Melbourne comprises a combination of 12 holes from the clubs West course and 6 holes from the East course all contained within the confines of the home paddock. The slight routing variation of this course which sees the 16th hole pass by the clubhouse is reflective of where matchplay matches on average finish. A new addition to the layout is the inclusion of the 16th hole of the East course which until now has not been included in the traditional composite course layout.
Friday, 13 December 2019
Notes 5 Foursomes matches or 5 Four-ball matches
Golf
Royal Melbourne Golf Club (Presidents Cup Course) (Guaranteed tickets to attend) 
The Presidents Cup course at Royal Melbourne comprises a combination of 12 holes from the clubs West course and 6 holes from the East course all contained within the confines of the home paddock. The slight routing variation of this course which sees the 16th hole pass by the clubhouse is reflective of where matchplay matches on average finish. A new addition to the layout is the inclusion of the 16th hole of the East course which until now has not been included in the traditional composite course layout.
Saturday, 14 December 2019
Notes 5 Foursomes matches / Four-ball matches
Golf
Royal Melbourne Golf Club (Presidents Cup Course) (Guaranteed tickets to attend) 
The Presidents Cup course at Royal Melbourne comprises a combination of 12 holes from the clubs West course and 6 holes from the East course all contained within the confines of the home paddock. The slight routing variation of this course which sees the 16th hole pass by the clubhouse is reflective of where matchplay matches on average finish. A new addition to the layout is the inclusion of the 16th hole of the East course which until now has not been included in the traditional composite course layout.
Sunday, 15 December 2019
Notes 12 Singles Matches & Trophy Presentation
Golf
Royal Melbourne Golf Club (Presidents Cup Course) (Guaranteed tickets to attend) 
The Presidents Cup course at Royal Melbourne comprises a combination of 12 holes from the clubs West course and 6 holes from the East course all contained within the confines of the home paddock. The slight routing variation of this course which sees the 16th hole pass by the clubhouse is reflective of where matchplay matches on average finish. A new addition to the layout is the inclusion of the 16th hole of the East course which until now has not been included in the traditional composite course layout.

Golf Courses

Kingston Heath Golf Club

Kingston Road
Cheltenham, VIC, 3192
Australia

Region: Melbourne Sandbelt

Kingston Heath Golf Club

Kingston Heath Golf Club is universally regarded as one of the best manicured courses in Australia and arguably the world. Its strategic bunkering and clever use of dips and hollows fools the non observant golfer and any deviation from the fairway is generally met with a challenging recovery. The course was built on a compact parcel of land resulting in some of the best short par 4's and world class par 3 holes.

Kingston Heath Golf Club is one of Australia's best golf courses. Currently ranked as the number 2 course in Australia and the 27th best course in the world, Kingston Heath enjoys an enviable reputation for its superb conditioning all year round.

The 18 holes were built on only 125 hectares (most courses in the modern era are built on over 250 hectares), it is perfectly manicured and its bunkering and clever use of dips and hollows visually fools the non observant golfer.

Many people would argue it is a more aesthetically pleasing course than the nearby Royal Melbourne, however if you wildly deviate from the fairway, the rough (comprising long grass, tea tree and sandy scrapes) will test your ability to get the ball back into play.

The 14th hole is a longish par 5 which, depending on the wind direction, can tempt the golfer into reaching the green for 2. One golfer Roger Mackay did better than that in a tournament at the Heath when he holed his second shot for an albatross.

The three par 3 holes are a feature of Kingston Heath and show off one fantastic feature of this great golf course - the classic, natural bunkering. The fifteenth hole, in particular, is a real test ( not necessarily needed towards the end of your round).

An uphill par 3 of moderate length, the path to the hole is surrounded by a myriad of bunkers (some of them very deep) all waiting to swallow the errant tee shot. If you reach the putting surface par is still not guaranteed as the undulating green gives up more 3 putts than 1 putts.

The remaining finishing holes are long par 4's and can ruin an otherwise good score. The 16th is known in golfing circles as the hole where Greg Norman took a 9 on his way to losing a tournament at Kingston Heath in the 1990's. Norman carved his tee shot into the right hand tea tree and it was all downhill from there.

Kingston Heath has hosted the Australian Open 8 times (7 men’s & 1 women’s) as well as hosting the 2009 Australian Masters. This event saw world number 1 golfer Tiger Woods grace the fairways of KH, and he didn’t disappoint, displaying superb shot-making over 4 rounds to take out the yellow jacket.

Kingston Heath is a wonderful golf course and a true delight to play. If you can manage to play a round there it is worth the effort - you will not be disappointed.

Course Information

Par: 72
ACR: 74
Length (m): 6352
Architect: Dan Soutar (bunkering by Alister Mackenzie)
Design Year: 1925
Top 100: 2

Playing Tips

1
Par 4, Length 418m

A long, accurate drive is required on this straight par four. Heavy rough and fairway bunkers make the first shot most demanding. An excellent starting hole.

2
Par 4, Length 351m

A well placed tee shot will leave only a short, uninterrupted pitch to the green. However, heavy timber on the left could spell trouble for any wayward shots or shortcut attempts. Accuracy, not distance, is the key.

3
Par 4, Length 269m

This is the shortest par four on the course. Most players will be looking for birdies here, but the terraced green is very undulating and could turn a potential one-putt into three.

4
Par 4, Length 357m

The fairway is wide open, but a drive to the left affords the best approach to the heavily bunkered green. Once again, the green has many undulations and slopes from back to front.

5
Par 3, Length 173m

Although this is the longest par three on the course, it is a fairly straightforward hole. There are plenty of sand traps on both sides, but the size of the green provides reasonable margin for error off the tee.

6
Par 4, Length 393m

A difficult par four requiring a long drive and a long second shot. A string of bunkers waits to snare any approach straying right, although the area around the green itself is fairly clear.

7
Par 5, Length 460m

The par five seventh hole is a definite birdie or eagle chance. Drive down the left centre of the fairway, short of the cross bunker. I favour a fairway wood or long iron to pass the small swale at the entrance of the green. Any shot short of the swale is very difficult to judge.

8
Par 4, Length 398m

Another long par four requiring placement off the tee. The drive must be kept left to open up the green and avoid fairway traps and rough on the corner of the dogleg. The green is severely bunkered on the left.

9
Par 4, Length 328m

A relief, but accuracy is essential. Many will use an iron from the tee. The green slopes from left to right and is virtually surrounded by bunkers and thick bush.

10
Par 3, Length 128m

There should be plenty of birdies on this short hole, but any misdirected shots will finish in either heavy rough or one of the numerous bunkers, which surround the green.

11
Par 4, Length 378m

This hole has many pitfalls. Fairway bunkers just over 200 metres from the tee, heavy timber on either side, and an out of bounds behind the narrow green. There will be more bogeys than birdies on this tough hole.

12
Par 5, Length 509m

A solid par 5, and a real birdie chance with three well executed shots. However, the players, who take the shortest line along the left, must contend with fairway traps, thick timber, and an out of bounds.

13
Par 4, Length 323m

Another potential birdie opportunity, but again the tee shot should be well placed. Any shot hit to the right will leave a more difficult approach over bunkers to the small green.

14
Par 5, Length 515m

The longest hole, where birdies will be scarce. Bunkers 45 metres short of the green leave little opening for long hitters attempt to get close in two. An out of bounds left and behind the green provides an additional mental hazard.

15
Par 3, Length 141m

This hole is considered by many to be one of the best par three's in Australia. The very narrow green is protected by deep bunkers on both sides and slopes sharply from back to front.

16
Par 4, Length 397m

The first of a trio of great finishing par four's. This hole doglegs right with a large number of bunkers perfectly placed to deter or challenge long hitters. The extremely fast, sloping green requires a delicate putting touch.

17
Par 4, Length 420m

An extremely difficult par four, particularly if the wind is blowing from the north. Any shot hooked to the left is 'dead', and the huge, sloping putting surface will produce many three-putts.

18
Par 4, Length 391m

An accurate long iron approach is required to set up a par on this hole. The green is guarded by traps on both sides and like the previous 17, has many rolls and borrows.

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Royal Melbourne Golf Club (Presidents Cup Course)

Cheltenham Road
Black Rock, VIC, 3193
Australia

Region: Melbourne Sandbelt

Royal Melbourne Golf Club (Presidents Cup Course)

The Presidents Cup course at Royal Melbourne comprises a combination of 12 holes from the clubs West course and 6 holes from the East course all contained within the confines of the home paddock. The slight routing variation of this course which sees the 16th hole pass by the clubhouse is reflective of where matchplay matches on average finish. A new addition to the layout is the inclusion of the 16th hole of the East course which until now has not been included in the traditional composite course layout.

The Presidents Cup course at Royal Melbourne comprises a combination of 12 holes from the clubs West course and 6 holes from the East course all contained within the confines of the home paddock.

The slight routing variation of this course which sees the 16th hole pass by the clubhouse is reflective of where matchplay matches on average finish. A new addition to the layout is the inclusion of the 16th hole of the East course which until now has not been included in the traditional composite course layout.

Course Information

Par: 72
ACR: 74
Length (m): 6394
Architect: Alex Russell (East Holes), Alister MacKenzie (West Holes)
Design Year: 1931, 1932

Playing Tips

1
Par 4, Length 304m

[3 West] - A deceptive hole, short with a big fairway trap, but a real birdie chance. Players need to drive left or centre, with a fairway trap guarding the right side and a steep hill running into deep rough for tee shots hooked too far left. The small fast-sloping green is stepped and guarded by deep bunkers at the entrance.

2
Par 5, Length 430m

[4 West] - A tough hole that is a good par if achieved. The drive goes over a hill, with fairway bunkers looming for the short shot. A wood or long iron approach must be straight, as bunkers on either side of the green are trouble.

3
Par 3, Length 161m

[5 West] - Accuracy and the right choice of club makes this a superb par three hole. A middle iron is needed to cross a valley to the green, heavily fortified with bunkers. The fast green has a steep slope from front to back and is a tricky test.

4
Par 4, Length 391m

[6 West] - Rated as the most difficult green on the course, the early shots are crucial. A sharp dog leg makes it vital that the tee shot carries a minimum of 200-metres across dense rough and fairway traps, in order to leave the ball in the right position. The elevated green slopes towards the front and produces many three putts.

5
Par 3, Length 135m

[7 West] - A deceptively easy-looking hole where club selection is vital. The tee shot must be well-placed, with the narrow green and difficult undulations making long putts tough. It goes uphill from the tee, with plenty of bunkers, especially for those who over-shoot the green.

6
Par 4, Length 279m

[10 West] - A tempting hole for the big hitters, especially if they attack the pin by cutting the corner. But that's where the danger is, as the sand bunker is huge and a miss can be penalised. It's short, but suits the disciplined players who go the right way around. But watch the long drivers tackle that corner!

7
Par 4, Length 416m

[11 West] - A deceptive hole that tempts the big hitters who challenge the fairway trap and rough on the left as they go direct. A second shot to a sloping green is a long haul and must be accurate, with bunkers guarding the entrance. A drive and a four iron can still produce many bogies.

8
Par 5, Length 435m

[12 West] - A lengthy fairway which requires a couple of long shots, especially off the tee where some early bunkers await the strong hitters. This modified par four becomes difficult into the northerly wind.

9
Par 4, Length 401m

[17 West] - Again two long shots are required, with the drive passing some bunkers on the left-hand side of the fairway. It's a tight driving hole and the second shot to a modified green needs a mid to short iron depending on the wind. Dangerous traps on the right make for a straight approach.

10
Par 4, Length 396m

[18 West] - This is a pleasant-looking hole, but full of danger. A dog-leg to the right means the drive must carry upwards and over 200-metres to present an approach shot from a downhill lie. The green looks awesome, well-protected by bunkers, but a good eight iron lobbed nicely will pay dividends.

11
Par 4, Length 324m

[1 East] - This is a real birdie chance, with a good drive able to set up a comfortable approach pitch. But beware - the green slopes down over the back and it's easy to finish well past the pin. Bunkers on the left are dangerous, but it's an open approach.

12
Par 4, Length 402m

[2 East] - A long-driving hole with a different approach. Accuracy is required off the tee to navigate the dog leg and then a deceptive hill up to the hole often leaves players short. The green is guarded by bunkers along the right fairway and on the left of the green.

13
Par 4, Length 350m

[3 East] - A deceptive hole; short for a par four, but an accurate iron is recommended off the tee as the target area is small. The green is guarded on both sides by sand traps, but a good eight iron can set up a birdie chance. A trough from the centre of the green running right can be a problem.

14
Par 3, Length 153m

[16 East] - This is one of the most picturesque holes at Royal Melbourne. From a slightly elevated tee the golfers plays over an abundance of scrub to a large, relatively flat green surrounded by a myriad of bunkers some of which cut into the green itself.

15
Par 5, Length 510m

[17 East] - One for the attacking golfers, with the barrier of fairway bunkers forcing the decision to go long twice or lay up short and approach with a sand iron. It's an open driving hole, but accuracy is needed, with all the emphasis on the choice of the second shot, with those traps neatly placed to catch the wrong decision-makers.

16
Par 4, Length 395m

[18 East] - A long hole back to the clubhouse, but offering the accurate hitters a birdie chance to sign off with. The long drivers still need a big second shot, but the green is large and inviting once you pass over the fairway bunkers. The green is surrounded by traps with some rough in front and the entry is nice and narrow.

17
Par 4, Length 392m

[1 West] - A good open driving hole, this presents a wide area leading up to a big green with little danger. But it's a deceptive hole, with a hooked tee shot leading to danger in unplayable trees on the left. A deep trap on the right of the green, plus a grassy mound and deep rough on the left, makes it a little deceptive. A hard par four and not a lot of birdies.

18
Par 5, Length 439m

[2 West] - A fast sloping green stands between a par and a possible eagle as this hole can be reached in two. There's plenty of room for the drive and a long iron can put big hitters on the green if they carry the bunkers guarding the entrance to the hole. Hitting too far left will find some thick ti-tree or maybe heavy rough - or the deep bunker.

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Spring Valley Golf Club

Heatherton Road
Clayton South, VIC, 3169
Australia

Region: Melbourne Sandbelt

Spring Valley Golf Club

Spring Valley Golf Club is one of those underrated golf courses located in the middle of the Melbourne Sandbelt. It is not a course that you may have heard about (compared to its famous neighbours) and this is what makes it even more alluring. From the time you drive in the new sweeping driveway and up to the multi million dollar new clubhouse which sits atop the 9th and 18th greens you will enjoy your day at Spring Valley.

Spring Valley Golf Club is one of those underrated golf courses located in the middle of the Melbourne Sandbelt. It is not a course that you may have heard about (compared to its famous neighbours like Royal Melbourne, Kingston Heath and The Metropolitan), but enjoys the pleasure of playing on a course borne out of the same terrain. This is what makes Spring Valley even more alluring.

Founded in 1948 the club has quietly gone about its business by providing the members with ever improving facilities. The golf course is home to a huge variety of bird life and its immaculate greens and fairways and signature bunkering contribute to 'The Valley's' rating as one of the top courses in Victoria.

It is a fine example of the work of Vern Morcom the son of Mick, the famous constructor who put all of Alister Mackenzie's work on the ground in Melbourne. Spring Valley is a true test of golf and features gentle undulations, much like Kingston Heath which is just down the road. The holes demand well shaped shots from the tees and the irons to the flags must be played with precision.

From the time you drive in the new sweeping driveway and up to the multi million dollar new clubhouse which sits atop the 9th and 18th greens you will enjoy your day at Spring Valley.

Course Information

Par: 71
ACR: 72
Length (m): 6161
Architect: Vern Morcom
Design Year: 1949
Top 100: 52

Playing Tips

1
Par 4, Length 377m

The opening hole is a fine medium length par four turning from left to right. The tee shot should, ideally be shaped the same way to avoid running through the left side of the fairway. Vern Morcom was both the architect at Spring Valley and the greenkeeper at nearby Kingston Heath and his father, Mick was the great constructor of most of Alister Mackenzies work in Australia.The sophistication of the Morcom family bunkering is immediately apparent at the first hole with a large and dramatic bunker guarding the left of the green.

2
Par 4, Length 386m

The second is a fine dogleg hole bending to the left. There is a line of fairway bunkers down the left which catches any errant drives. The green and greenside bunkering is superb and is a real classic example of Morcom's design style.

3
Par 3, Length 150m

The first of the short holes is played across a flat piece of ground with a middle to short iron to a target that is the easiest to hit of the four short holes. The green is big and not surrounded by the particularly intimidating Melbourne bunkers that characterize the best par threes in the city. Certainly the more difficult par threes are left for later in the round.

4
Par 4, Length 331m

A first class short par 4 which bends gently to the right. The main course reservoir borders the hole to the left and it's banks offer a pleasing backdrop to the drive. The green is very small and beautifully bunkered, both left and right.

5
Par 3, Length 155m

A classic sand belt par 3 and one the Club Members are extremely proud of. The hole is played uphill to a green guarded by a nest of bunkers on the left and a single bunker on the right. The small green is elevated from the natural surrounding ground.

6
Par 4, Length 364m

The hole turns from right to left and plays downhill from the tee with the principle driving hazard being a bunker built at the top of the hill. Longer hitters who carry the fairway bunker will have a pitch to the green with only a short iron. Shorter hitters should play wide of the fairway bunker but be aware that in being too far right off the tee that the green is undulating and protected by a bunker from the right side.

7
Par 5, Length 479m

The first of three par fives plays as a straight hole but the bunker placement here demands players are wary of sand with both tee shot and the long second up to the green. Bunkers await those who drive left from the tee and two bunkers short and right of the green make for a difficult shot because that intermediate bunker shot of between 25 and 40 meters is one of the most difficult in the game. The green gives the appearance of being raised, simply by a swale cut across the front of the green and continuing around the right side of the putting surface.

8
Par 4, Length 355m

Ideally the drive should be hit to the right side of the fairway but be wary! Too far right off the tee and the player may not find the ball. The shot to the elevated green must be precise as bunkers guard the left side and the slope of the green makes any chip shot a real challenge.

9
Par 4, Length 412m

This hole is the most difficult on the course and it's quality is underrated simply because it plays across a gentle piece of ground. On a more undulating fairway this would be recognized as one of the finest holes in Melbourne simply because the architectural principle around which it is based were perfectly executed by Morcom. The drive off the tee is preferably to the left side of the fairway avoiding the fairway bunker. A perfectly struck drive will open the green up from the left as coming in from the right hand side of the hole demands the second shot being played over a greenside bunker and swale.

10
Par 3, Length 134m

A short, but without question, very attractive hole which to it's credit places the emphasis on accuracy rather than length. The hole is played downhill to a small, well bunkered green. Keep the ball low on this hole as the wind can play havoc.

11
Par 4, Length 332m

A short par 4 hole which is played turning left around the side of a sandy ridge. The drive is to the top of the hill and beyond. The second shot is downhill to a small green guarded by bunkers on both sides.

12
Par 5, Length 483m

This par 5 is just short enough to tempt the player to hit the green for two. A slightly pushed shot will be caught by the water which comes into play about 30 metres short right. An undulating green makes club selection difficult.

13
Par 4, Length 348m

A dogleg hole that demands an accurate tee shot being played. For the shorter hitter water presents a challenge before fairway bunkers also come into play.

14
Par 3, Length 200m

long par three and one of the best in Melbourne . The green is small and beautifully bunkered and only the finest of long irons will find the green here.

15
Par 4, Length 381m

Another fine par 4 which meanders gently downhill. The second shot is to a green which is set on a low level with a greenside bunker on the right hand side. A fairway bunker is located short of the green on the left hand side but shouldn't come into play.

16
Par 4, Length 408m

A dogleg hole which bends sharply to the right. There is a series of three fairway bunkers along the right hand side. The shot to the green requires an accurate mid iron to a small green which is guarded by bunkers on both the left and the right.

17
Par 5, Length 477m

Fairways bunkers taunt the player throughout this hole. It is not a long Par 5 but it does demand strategic play. Being a Par 5 it rewards great shot playing with a reachable green in two. The green evolves from the fairway and is well guarded by bunkers.

18
Par 4, Length 389m

A beautifully bunkered, attractive finishing hole, played uphill to the Clubhouse. The hole is undulating and it's features two fairway bunkers to the right.. The green is gently sloping, and when quick offers some treacherous putting.

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The Metropolitan Golf Club

Golf Road
Oakleigh South, VIC, 3167
Australia

Region: Melbourne Sandbelt

The Metropolitan Golf Club

The Metropolitan Golf Club is one of Australia's premier golf courses. Tucked quietly in Melbourne's south eastern suburbs it is one of the renowned "sandbelt courses" and widely recognised as one of the finest golf courses in Australia. It has also been described as the Australian equivalent of Augusta National. The perfect fairways, marbletop greens and blindingly white bunkers all combine to offer a test of golf not seen previously in Australia. Metropolitan is a tough but fair test of golf.

The Metropolitan Golf Club is one of Australia's premier golf courses. Tucked quietly in Melbourne's south eastern suburbs it is one of the renowned "sandbelt courses" and widely recognised as one of the finest golf courses in Australia.

The course has continually challenged the best players in the world. Peter Thomson began his brilliant career with a win here in the 1951 Australian Open. Jack Newton won the Australian Open in 1979 by one shot from a young Greg Norman, who three putted the final green.

In 1993 Brad Faxon mastered Metropolitan with a four round score of 275, 13 under par, including equaling Greg Norman's course record 65.

In 1997 Lee Westwood won a very exciting Australian Open defeating Greg Norman in a sudden death playoff on the 18th hole.

In 2001 the course hosted the World Matchplay Championships-a tournament which saw the world's top golfers gather at Metropolitan for a unique matchplay event where the unlikely winner Steve Stricker walked away with a cool $1 million pay cheque.

Most recently the course hosted the 2009 Women’s Australian Open with former world number one Laura Davies prevailing in a very exciting finish.

Metropolitan Golf Club can also be described as the Australian equivalent of Augusta National. The perfect fairways, marbletop greens and blindingly white bunkers all combine to offer a test of golf not seen previously in Australia. Metropolitan is a tough but fair test of golf.

Course Information

Par: 72
ACR: 74
Length (m): 6427
Architect: J.B. Mackenzie (1906), Dick Wilson (1959)
Design Year: 1906
Top 100: 13

Playing Tips

1
Par 4, Length 372m

The tee shot should be played right of the fairway bunker on the left. The second shot to an open green requires a long iron or fairway wood.

2
Par 3, Length 143m

One of the most picturesque holes on the course. The hole is heavily bunkered and the green moderately contoured. Anything not landing on the green will bring about a tough second shot.

3
Par 4, Length 368m

A two-tiered green sloping from left to right requires a tee shot to be played into the right hand side of the fairway. Such positioning opens up the second shot to the green. However, the greenside bunkers on the left is one to stay away from.

4
Par 5, Length 444m

A fairway bunker jutting out from the right side of the fairway requires a tee shot down the left. The second shot should be played short of the bunkers, allowing a pitch to a slightly elevated green. This hole favours the long hitters.

5
Par 4, Length 340m

Another hole made more difficult by the addition of a new championship tee. Two deep fairway bunkers are right in play down the left side of the driving area, the right hand fairway bunker is of little concern. The green features a huge slope off the shoulder of the right hand greenside bunker and if the flag is in the right half of the green an approach from the left half of the fairway - usually with a short or mid iron - is ideal. Widely regarded as one of the classic holes on the course.

6
Par 5, Length 457m

The 6th is the second of three front nine par fives and the player must drive to the far left side of the dogleg if an approach over the huge gum trees that block both the shot and view down to the green is to be avoided. Jack Nicklaus, famously, carried the fairway bunker that stretches across the left half of the fairway (270 metres) with a driver and a small ball in the 1967 Australian P.G.A Championship. The green and surrounds have been redesigned, the new cavernous bunkers and heavily contoured green require skilled shotmaking whether from a long second or short third shot.

7
Par 3, Length 180m

The longest par three on the course is characterized by a generous green sloping from the top right to the bottom left from the tee. A long iron or wood is required.

8
Par 5, Length 460m

A big fairway bunker has to be negotiated with the drive. The second shot should be placed on the right side of the fairway, which makes the approach considerably easier as the green slopes from left to right.

9
Par 4, Length 386m

A perfect hole to drag out that tired old story of "when I was your age I could drive it across those trees". In 1968 Nicklaus flew it over the corner trees on this sharp dogleg right with a three wood and hit a wedge to the green for four straight days but "the trees were only so high when I was your age". They have grown up so tall now it's impossible to pull that shot off. Most play down to the corner with a long iron or a three wood and if the driver comes out it has to be perfectly faded around the corner or it runs through the fairway. The second shot can vary between a four iron down to an eight or nine. This is the most beautifully contoured and shaped green on the golf course - being on in two is no guarantee of a par.

10
Par 4, Length 396m

A long dogleg left plays all of its length. The hole requires two good shots to reach the large green in two.

11
Par 3, Length 140m

A testing par three. The green slopes diagonally as you look at it from the tee-box. The tee shot should be directed towards the left part of the green. Play conservatively.

12
Par 4, Length 351m

Off the tee, the ideal position is the centre right part of the fairway to avoid sand traps on the left. The second shot should be played to the right side of the green, taking the front bunkers out of play.

13
Par 3, Length 131m

Playing to a large, well bunkered green, a shot to the middle of the putting surface is desirable. if you miss the green, be prepared for a tough up and down.

14
Par 5, Length 495m

A dogleg left as well as fairway bunkers on that side demand a shot to the right of the fairway off the tee. From there the second shot should be played to within pitching distance of the green with a chance for birdie. This hole favours the long hitters.

15
Par 4, Length 410m

This is probably the most difficult of Metropolitan's par fours and again the strategy is simple and clear. A long bunker with a high lip sits into the left side of the fairway and a green that angles from its front left corner to the back right clearly favours an approach from close to the fairway bunker. A greenside bunker closes off the flag for those approaching from the right and only a big high fade will get the job done for those who fly their drives too far to the right.

16
Par 4, Length 314m

This short par four doglegs sharply right around several deep fairway bunkers that have proved pivotal in deciding at least two Australian Opens. Bob Shearer in 1979 and Ian Baker-Finch in 1986 both drove into the bunkers and made killer bogeys that cost them their chance in those tournaments. Some can drive far enough to reach the green but it's almost impossible to keep such a long shot on the small sloping green. Often the pin placement dictates the best place to play to from the tee with the most difficult pin to get close to being behind the front right bunker, when the flag is there it's often easier to approach from 70 metres than it is from 30. A wonderful example of how great a well designed short par four can be.

17
Par 4, Length 374m

A single deep bunker that is almost impossible to hit the green from, sits in the left side of the driving area. It's the one place not to go. Some curiously sited trees (but favorites of the members) 60 metres short of the green make for a blind second for those who have driven to the right, although that is the only effect they have in the play of the hole. The green is relatively large, not in truth that difficult to hit and only when the pin is tucked close to the bunkers do they have much influence on the approach.

18
Par 4, Length 383m

The championship tee added for the 1997 Australian Open stretched this hole out to 433 metres and into a wind from the north it's a brutally difficult hole. The hole is actually dead straight and it is the blocked drive that is caught by the fairway bunkers down the right, but when the flag is on the left of the green it's clearly best to approach from close to the bunkers. In the 1979 Australian Open, Greg Norman hit two terrific shots, the second with a five iron, just under the tier of the two level green and then three putted to lose by one to Jack Newton. Eighteen years later in 1997, from almost exactly the same spot, Norman three putted in the playoff with Lee Westwood to lose the Open again.

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Yarra Yarra Golf Club

567 Warrigal Road
Bentleigh East, VIC, 3165
Australia

Region: Melbourne Sandbelt

Yarra Yarra Golf Club

The architect of this renowned Sandbelt course was Alex Russell who, in 1926, formed a partnership with the famed Dr Alister MacKenzie during his visit to Australia. Today, the course remains substantially the same as the original layout and like all great golf courses, has stood the test of time. The superb greens and bunkers are the highlight at Yarra Yarra and as good as many of MacKenzie?s own creations. Typically large, fast and undulating, the greens feature some of the most extreme slopes in Melbourne, while the bunkers are constructed to blend naturally with their surrounds and are intrinsic to the strategy of each hole. The course has been the scene of many major tournaments in its history, leading to world-wide recognition by amateurs and professionals alike.

The architect of this renowned Sandbelt course was Alex Russell who, in 1926, formed a partnership with the famed Dr Alister MacKenzie during his visit to Australia. Today, the course remains substantially the same as the original layout and like all great golf courses, has stood the test of time.

The superb greens and bunkers are the highlight at Yarra Yarra and as good as many of MacKenzie’s own creations. Typically large, fast and undulating, the greens feature some of the most extreme slopes in Melbourne, while the bunkers are constructed to blend naturally with their surrounds and are intrinsic to the strategy of each hole.

The course has been the scene of many major tournaments in its history, leading to world-wide recognition by amateurs and professionals alike.

 “Yarra Yarra is one of the finest courses designed by the esteemed Alex Russell and stands up extremely well in a neighbourhood noted worldwide for fine and unique golf courses. Mr. Russell surely made the most of an elegant piece of property.” Tom Doak, Renaissance Golf Design 

Signature Holes (include description):

A: 2nd Hole - One of Yarra Yarra’s tougher par 4’s, a long tee shot is required to set up a second shot to an elevated green. The difficult second shot, played from a downslope, will require a decision on whether to attempt to carry the bunkers 40 metres short of the green or to lay-up. Bunkers are situated left and right of the green. Golf.com rated the 2nd hole at Yarra Yarra in the Top 500 holes in the world. One of my favourite holes in golf. Love the little contour that steers a

left-centre drive further left to make you go over the big mound of bunkers with your second.” Tom Doak – Renaissance Golf Design

B: 11th Hole - Yarra Yarra’s signature hole provides one of the toughest par 3’s you will encounter. A long iron approach to a narrow ‘Redan’ style green means nothing but a perfect shot will do. There are three tiers on the elevated green making putting difficult. Peter Thomson once stated that the “11th hole at Yarra Yarra should be regarded as a National Treasure.”

C: 15th Hole - A mid iron tee shot to a narrow green. The green has a big tier running through the middle, so the trick on this hole is to hit the tee shot on the same level as the pin. Depending on the wind and the pin position, this hole can play short or very long.  Bunkers guard the front, left and right sides of the green, with no easy up and downs.

Course Information

Par: 72
ACR: 72
Length (m): 6102
Architect: Alex Russell
Design Year: 1929
Top 100: 51

Playing Tips

1
Par 4, Length 330m

A very tight par four requiring an accurate tee shot then an accurate approach shot can set up a birdie opportunity. Bunkers left and right call for an on target shot into the green.

2
Par 4, Length 400m

The fifth is a slight dog leg to the right and requires a well struck tee shot to the left centre of the fairway. A collection of bunkers, force you to a decide if you will lay up short, or go for the green, which is protected to the right and left by bunkers.

3
Par 3, Length 201m

This hole approaches a narrow green and calls for a long iron or wood approach. There are bunkers left and right, so being either short or long should not be a problem.

4
Par 4, Length 361m

The second hole is a dog leg to the right. Long hitters elect to use a long iron or 3 wood to avoid the fairway bunker on the right hand side of the fairway. The best line is at the white sign in the distance. The green is protected on the right by a large bunker and there are bunkers lurking at the back of the green. So, it is best to aim for the left hand side of the green.

5
Par 4, Length 293m

An accurate tee shot is a must. There are bunkers situated left and right of the fairway guarding a small landing area. A short iron can set you up for a birdie chance. Best to be below the hole. Bunkers situated front and back.

6
Par 3, Length 117m

A short uphill hole with a long green. Club selection and accuracy are vital. Bunkers right and deep bunkers left catch any stray shot.

7
Par 4, Length 371m

Long hitters attempt to carry the fairway bunker on the right opening up the green for a second shot with a long to medium iron.The front left hand side of the green is protected by a well positioned bunker. The green slopes slightly from the front to the back and drops away to the right making approach shots and putting rather difficult.

8
Par 5, Length 502m

Position the drive left of centre fairway to leave the second shot clear. A good drive and fairway wood for the second shot sets up a short pitch into the green.

9
Par 5, Length 479m

The ninth requires a drive to the right of centre avoiding the fairway bunkers on the left. The second shot is played to a right to left sloping fairway and needs to be kept right of centre avoiding the fairway bunker on the left. The ninth green contains many slopes and bumps, making approach shots and putting tough.

10
Par 4, Length 360m

All the trouble here is right. An accurate long iron should be positioned down the left side of the fairway. The second shot is a short iron approach. If you miss the green here its best to be short. The back, left and right sides of the green slope away.

11
Par 3, Length 168m

This is a tough hole. Bunkers guard the front of this elevated green and club selection is vital. A three tiered green makes putting difficult.

12
Par 4, Length 372m

The twelfth hole requires a tee shot in the left centre of the fairway avoiding the bunker on the right. The second shot is played to an elevated green sloping from the back to the front and dropping away considerably at the front of the green. It is a good idea to hit one more club than you think. Bunkers guard the left and right sides of the green.

13
Par 4, Length 419m

Rated number one on the course the thirteenth requires a long tee shot to carry the fairway bunkers and open up the green for your second shot. The green is long and has a large slope from back to front, which makes putting extremely difficult.

14
Par 4, Length 346m

This is a straight par four. Position the drive down the left centre of the fairway. The trouble here is the ride side of the green, which is guarded by a bunker.

15
Par 3, Length 149m

The trick on this hole is to be on the same level as the pin. Depending on the wind and the pin position, this hole can play short or very long. Bunkers guard the front, left and right sides of the green.

16
Par 5, Length 454m

The sixteenth hole offers long hitters the prospect of an eagle putt and most golfers a good chance at a birdie. The drive needs to be in the right centre of the fairway giving you the best line to attack the green with your second shot, which is the left centre of the green. Shorter hitters may elect to lay up short of the bunkers leaving you a pitch and a chance at a birdie.

17
Par 4, Length 366m

Trees tightly line the left and right sides of this fairway. Aim the drive down the middle of the fairway to set up a short iron approach. The approach shot is played slightly down hill to a large green.

18
Par 5, Length 442m

This is a great short par 5 hole giving you an excellent chance of finishing your round on a good note. The drive needs to be threaded between fairway bunkers left and right. Your second shot should be placed to the left, which opens up the green for a pitch shot. Long hitters can reach the green in two.

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Matthew Ridge, Golf Travel Manager, GOLFSelect

Matthew Ridge Golf Travel Manager

Richard Morgan, Golf Travel Specialist, GOLFSelect

Richard Morgan Golf Travel Specialist

Gary Lisbon, Managing Director and Owner, GOLFSelect

Gary Lisbon Managing Director and Owner

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